Specialty
Spotlight

 




 


Anaesthesia


   

 




Ambulatory
Surgery

  

  • Swan
    BA, Maislan G, Traber KB,

    Symptom
    Distress and Functional Status Changes During the
    First Seven Days After Ambulatory Surgery

    Anesth
    Analg 86: 739-745, 1998



     


    Ambulatory
    surgery is being performed in sicker patients who
    may be at increased risk of perioperative morbidity.
    There is little information on how to ensure
    high-quality care while improving patient outcomes
    in this type of health care delivery.
    Most studies of ambulatory surgery have
    focused on morbidity, mortality, and unexpected
    hospitalization. To
    gain a more comprehensive appreciation of the
    response to surgery, perioperative changes in
    symptom distress and functional status were
    evaluated in patients undergoing ambulatory surgery.

      

    Participants
    included 123 patients undergoing one of two
    ambulatory surgical procedures; incisional inguinal
    hernia repair [41 patients] and diagnostic or
    interventional laparoscopy [59 patients].
    All patients were adults, aged 18 to 64
    years, and in American Society of
    Anesthesiologists’ [ASA] physical status I to III.
    Using the General Symptom Distress Scale, changes in
    symptom distress were studied at 24 hours and 4 and
    7 days after surgery. At the same time, basic and
    intermediate activities of daily living were
    assessed using the Functional Status Questionnaire.
    Change estimates were created with adjustment
    for age, ASA physical status, type of anesthesia and
    study site.  Patient
    responses indicated persistent symptom distress
    throughout the first postoperative week.
    In the hernia group functional status was
    significantly decreased.
    After laparoscopy, symptom distress appeared
    to be higher and functional status lower in older vs
    younger patients. By
    the end of the week less than a fourth of the
    patients had returned to work.

       

    In
    patients undergoing ambulatory surgery, symptom
    distress and decreased functional status, continue
    throughout the first week after surgery.

       

    Although these outcomes are not major
    surgical problems, they are clinically significant.
    As the use of ambulatory surgery continues to
    increase, careful assessment of discharge criteria
    will be essential to prevent complications occurring
    when the patient is recovering at home.

       




 

 

Specialty Spotlight

 

 
Anaesthesia
   

 

Ambulatory Surgery
  

  • Swan BA, Maislan G, Traber KB,
    Symptom Distress and Functional Status Changes During the First Seven Days After Ambulatory Surgery
    Anesth Analg 86: 739-745, 1998
     
    Ambulatory surgery is being performed in sicker patients who may be at increased risk of perioperative morbidity. There is little information on how to ensure high-quality care while improving patient outcomes in this type of health care delivery. Most studies of ambulatory surgery have focused on morbidity, mortality, and unexpected hospitalization. To gain a more comprehensive appreciation of the response to surgery, perioperative changes in symptom distress and functional status were evaluated in patients undergoing ambulatory surgery.
      
    Participants included 123 patients undergoing one of two ambulatory surgical procedures; incisional inguinal hernia repair [41 patients] and diagnostic or interventional laparoscopy [59 patients]. All patients were adults, aged 18 to 64 years, and in American Society of Anesthesiologists’ [ASA] physical status I to III. Using the General Symptom Distress Scale, changes in symptom distress were studied at 24 hours and 4 and 7 days after surgery. At the same time, basic and intermediate activities of daily living were assessed using the Functional Status Questionnaire. Change estimates were created with adjustment for age, ASA physical status, type of anesthesia and study site.  Patient responses indicated persistent symptom distress throughout the first postoperative week. In the hernia group functional status was significantly decreased. After laparoscopy, symptom distress appeared to be higher and functional status lower in older vs younger patients. By the end of the week less than a fourth of the patients had returned to work.
       
    In patients undergoing ambulatory surgery, symptom distress and decreased functional status, continue throughout the first week after surgery.
       
    Although these outcomes are not major surgical problems, they are clinically significant. As the use of ambulatory surgery continues to increase, careful assessment of discharge criteria will be essential to prevent complications occurring when the patient is recovering at home.
       

 

By |2022-07-20T16:44:11+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Ambulatory Surgery

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