Speciality
Spotlight

 




 


Cardiology


 


   





Beta Blocker


  • Scott Gottlieb

    Beta Blocker response may have gene link


    BMJ, Vol.322, April 7, 2001, p.814

       

    A new study has suggested that patients with CCF who have a mutation in the ACE gene are likely to respond especially well to beta-blockers.

      


    These findings relate to people with mutation known as the ACE deletion (it lacks a small piece of DNA found in the normal ACE gene). Activation of renin angiotensin system adversely affects progression of heart failure.

        

    Dr.McNamara and colleagues followed 328 patients with heart failure and they looked at the ACE gene. Patients who had 2 ACE deletion “short’ versions of the ACE gene fared far better when their treatment included a beta-blocker than those with 2 “long” versions of the gene. Patients with 2 short versions of the ACE gene have the highest level of ACE activity which makes the heart work harder and deteriorate more rapidly.

        


    Overall, during a median follow up of 21 months, patients with 2 “short” versions had a significantly poorer 2 transplant-free survival (60%) than patients with 2 “long” versions (78%) and those with 1 short and 1 long version (65%). This is the first study to look at a very common genetic trait and its interaction with a very common therapy for heart failure. Larger studies will be needed before patients are either given or excluded from receiving beta-blockers on the basis of their genes.

      




 

 

Speciality Spotlight

 

   

Beta Blocker

  • Scott Gottlieb
    Beta Blocker response may have gene link
    BMJ, Vol.322, April 7, 2001, p.814
       
    A new study has suggested that patients with CCF who have a mutation in the ACE gene are likely to respond especially well to beta-blockers.
      
    These findings relate to people with mutation known as the ACE deletion (it lacks a small piece of DNA found in the normal ACE gene). Activation of renin angiotensin system adversely affects progression of heart failure.
        
    Dr.McNamara and colleagues followed 328 patients with heart failure and they looked at the ACE gene. Patients who had 2 ACE deletion “short’ versions of the ACE gene fared far better when their treatment included a beta-blocker than those with 2 “long” versions of the gene. Patients with 2 short versions of the ACE gene have the highest level of ACE activity which makes the heart work harder and deteriorate more rapidly.
        
    Overall, during a median follow up of 21 months, patients with 2 “short” versions had a significantly poorer 2 transplant-free survival (60%) than patients with 2 “long” versions (78%) and those with 1 short and 1 long version (65%). This is the first study to look at a very common genetic trait and its interaction with a very common therapy for heart failure. Larger studies will be needed before patients are either given or excluded from receiving beta-blockers on the basis of their genes.
      

 

By |2022-07-20T16:44:32+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Beta Blocker

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