Speciality
Spotlight

 




 


Cardiology


 


   





Cardiac
Surgery in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

  

  • Mitruka
    SN, Griffith BP, Kormos RL, et al

    Cardiac Operations
    in Solid-organ Transplant Recipients

    Ann
    Thorac Surg 64: 1270-1278, 1997

      

    In
    recent years, the number of patients receiving solid
    organ transplants has steadily increased.
    So too have the numbers of such patients who
    later require cardiac surgery. Little is known about
    how best to approach such cases.
    The authors report their experiences in such
    situations.

     

    Two
    patients died [3%] within 30 days of cardiac surgery;
    one because of sepsis and one as a result of cardiac
    arrest. Seven
    patients [11%] died between 7 weeks and 26 months
    after cardiac surgery, but none of these deaths were
    attributed to a cardiac cause.
    Preoperatively 16 patients [25%] had chronic
    renal failure; 13 of these were renal transplant
    recipients. Postoperatively
    7 of the renal transplant recipients [54] had renal
    failure and required hemodialysis; 4 improved by
    discharge but 3 experienced permanent allograft loss.
    Furthermore 3 other patients had transient graft
    rejection that was successfully treated with pulse
    steroids.

        

    Overall
    none of the 17 liver transplant recipients experienced
    graft rejection or failure; 1 of the 7 heart or lung
    transplant recipients experienced rejection; 7 of the
    40 kidney transplant recipients experienced temporary
    [4] and permanent [3] allograft failure and 2
    experienced rejection. Other major complications
    included infections [12 patients or 19%], and bleeding
    that required re-exploration [16%]; complications were
    most common in the kidney transplant recipients.

        

    At
    a mean follow-up of 22 months 5o of 55 surviving
    patients [91%] were alive without recurrent cardiac
    disease.

       

    Infections
    and bleeding complications were short term but not
    insignificant; these were likely related to
    immunosuppression and other co-morbid conditions.
    Permanent graft failure and rejection rates
    were low and mortality rates were comparable with
    those of non-transplant receiving patients undergoing
    cardiac surgery. Thus,
    when appropriate precautions are taken organ
    transplant recipients can have safe cardiac surgery.

          




 

 

Speciality Spotlight

 

   

Cardiac Surgery in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients
  

  • Mitruka SN, Griffith BP, Kormos RL, et al
    Cardiac Operations in Solid-organ Transplant Recipients
    Ann Thorac Surg 64: 1270-1278, 1997
      
    In recent years, the number of patients receiving solid organ transplants has steadily increased. So too have the numbers of such patients who later require cardiac surgery. Little is known about how best to approach such cases. The authors report their experiences in such situations.
     
    Two patients died [3%] within 30 days of cardiac surgery; one because of sepsis and one as a result of cardiac arrest. Seven patients [11%] died between 7 weeks and 26 months after cardiac surgery, but none of these deaths were attributed to a cardiac cause. Preoperatively 16 patients [25%] had chronic renal failure; 13 of these were renal transplant recipients. Postoperatively 7 of the renal transplant recipients [54] had renal failure and required hemodialysis; 4 improved by discharge but 3 experienced permanent allograft loss. Furthermore 3 other patients had transient graft rejection that was successfully treated with pulse steroids.
        
    Overall none of the 17 liver transplant recipients experienced graft rejection or failure; 1 of the 7 heart or lung transplant recipients experienced rejection; 7 of the 40 kidney transplant recipients experienced temporary [4] and permanent [3] allograft failure and 2 experienced rejection. Other major complications included infections [12 patients or 19%], and bleeding that required re-exploration [16%]; complications were most common in the kidney transplant recipients.
        
    At a mean follow-up of 22 months 5o of 55 surviving patients [91%] were alive without recurrent cardiac disease.
       
    Infections and bleeding complications were short term but not insignificant; these were likely related to immunosuppression and other co-morbid conditions. Permanent graft failure and rejection rates were low and mortality rates were comparable with those of non-transplant receiving patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Thus, when appropriate precautions are taken organ transplant recipients can have safe cardiac surgery.
          

 

By |2022-07-20T16:44:23+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Solid Organ Transplant

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