Speciality
Spotlight

 




           

Clinical Pharmacology

       

     





Oral
Contraceptives

   

  • R.D.T.
    Farmer, R.A. Lawrenson, et al (European Institute of
    Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey,
    Guildford, Department of Epidemiology and Population
    Health, Cancer and Public Health Unit, London School
    of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London.




    A Comparison of the risks of venous
    thromboembolic disease in association with different
    combined oral contraceptives.





    Br. J.Clin. Pharmacol.49(6),June 2000, 580-590.


      


    In October
    1995, in response to the results of 3 studies the
    committee on the safety of medicines advised doctors
    and pharmacists that Ocs
    containing desogestrel (DSG) and gestodene (GST)
    were associated with around 2 fold increase in the
    risk of thromboembolism compared with those
    containing other progestogens. Objective of present study was to estimate
    the risk of idiopathic venous thromboembolic disease
    (VTE) in users of combined Ocs
    (COC), to compare the risk between formulations.  The method used was, a case-control study using the General
    Practice Research Database. Women with VTE event recorded between 1992
    and 1997, who were treated with an anticoagulant,
    were likely to have been using a COC on the day of
    the event and had no exclusion factors, were deemed
    cases.




      

    The authors
    found a significant association between idiopathic VTE and
    current smoking, BMI over 35, and asthma and general
    ill-health (indicated by number of prescriptions
    issued). The
    results of this study indicate that a number of
    characteristics of the women taking COCs affect the
    risk of VTE.




      

    There is no
    evidence to support the hypothesis that there is any
    difference in risk between COC formulations
    containing under 50 micro-gm ethinyloestradiol.

      




  
 



 

     

Speciality Spotlight

 

           
Clinical Pharmacology
       

     

Oral Contraceptives
   

  • R.D.T. Farmer, R.A. Lawrenson, et al (European Institute of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Cancer and Public Health Unit, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London.


    A Comparison of the risks of venous thromboembolic disease in association with different combined oral contraceptives.


    Br. J.Clin. Pharmacol.49(6),June 2000, 580-590.
      
    In October 1995, in response to the results of 3 studies the committee on the safety of medicines advised doctors and pharmacists that Ocs containing desogestrel (DSG) and gestodene (GST) were associated with around 2 fold increase in the risk of thromboembolism compared with those containing other progestogens. Objective of present study was to estimate the risk of idiopathic venous thromboembolic disease (VTE) in users of combined Ocs (COC), to compare the risk between formulations.  The method used was, a case-control study using the General Practice Research Database. Women with VTE event recorded between 1992 and 1997, who were treated with an anticoagulant, were likely to have been using a COC on the day of the event and had no exclusion factors, were deemed cases.


      
    The authors found a significant association between idiopathic VTE and current smoking, BMI over 35, and asthma and general ill-health (indicated by number of prescriptions issued). The results of this study indicate that a number of characteristics of the women taking COCs affect the risk of VTE.


      
    There is no evidence to support the hypothesis that there is any difference in risk between COC formulations containing under 50 micro-gm ethinyloestradiol.
      

    

 

By |2022-07-20T16:42:13+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Oral Contraceptives

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