Speciality
Spotlight

 




           

Clinical Pharmacology

       

     





Unstable
Coronary Artery Disease

   

  • Lars
    Wallentin, Bo Lagerqvist, et al (Department of
    Cardiology and Thoracic Surgery, University
    Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, University Hospital,
    Aarhus, Denmark)




    Outcome at 1 year after an invasive compared with
    a non-invasive strategy in unstable coronary-artery
    disease: The FRISC II invasive randomized trial.




    Lancet, vol.356, July 1, 2000, P.9-15,

      

    Invasive
    procedures have become increasingly common early
    after an episode of unstable coronary-artery
    disease, even in patients who are clinically
    stabilised.




      

    The 6
    months results of FRISC II (Fast revascularisation
    during instability in coronary artery disease)
    invasive trial showed a reduction in death or
    myocardial infarction with an invasive strategy in
    patients with unstable coronary-artery disease and
    signs of ischemia. Similar results were not seen in 2 previous
    large-scale randomized trials.




      

    After
    1 year in 1000 patients, an invasive strategy saved
    1.7 lives, prevented 2.0 non-fatal myocardial
    infarctions and 20 readmissions, and provided
    earlier and better symptom relief at the cost of 15
    more patients with coronary-artery bypass grafting
    and 21 more with percutaneous transluminal
    angioplasty. Therefore,
    an invasive approach should be the preferred
    strategy in patients with unstable coronary-artery
    disease and signs of ischemia on ECG or raised
    levels of biochemical markers of myocardial damage.

       



  
 



 

     

Speciality Spotlight

 

           
Clinical Pharmacology
       

     

Unstable Coronary Artery Disease
   

  • Lars Wallentin, Bo Lagerqvist, et al (Department of Cardiology and Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark)


    Outcome at 1 year after an invasive compared with a non-invasive strategy in unstable coronary-artery disease: The FRISC II invasive randomized trial.


    Lancet, vol.356, July 1, 2000, P.9-15,
      
    Invasive procedures have become increasingly common early after an episode of unstable coronary-artery disease, even in patients who are clinically stabilised.


      
    The 6 months results of FRISC II (Fast revascularisation during instability in coronary artery disease) invasive trial showed a reduction in death or myocardial infarction with an invasive strategy in patients with unstable coronary-artery disease and signs of ischemia. Similar results were not seen in 2 previous large-scale randomized trials.


      
    After 1 year in 1000 patients, an invasive strategy saved 1.7 lives, prevented 2.0 non-fatal myocardial infarctions and 20 readmissions, and provided earlier and better symptom relief at the cost of 15 more patients with coronary-artery bypass grafting and 21 more with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Therefore, an invasive approach should be the preferred strategy in patients with unstable coronary-artery disease and signs of ischemia on ECG or raised levels of biochemical markers of myocardial damage.
       

    

 

By |2022-07-20T16:42:17+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Unstable Coronary Artery Disease

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