Speciality
Spotlight

 




 


Endocrinology


   

  




Infertility

      

  • SR
    Lincoln, et al (Univ of Tenessee, Memphis)

     

    Screening for Hypothyroidism in Infertile women

    J Reprod Med  44: 455-457,
    1999.

        

    Background – Previous research has suggested
    that infertility is closely associated with
    hypothyroidism. 
    However, the incidence of hypothyroidism in
    infertile women is estimated to be less than 1%, and
    many clinicians 
    question the value of including routine
    screening for hypothyroidism as part of the
    infertility assessment.
    The frequency of increased thyroid
    stimulating hormone (TSH) in patients with a history
    of infertility seen at reproductive endocrinology
    and infertility centers was investigated.

         

    Conclusions
    – The prevalence of increased TSH was 2.3% in this
    group of women with infertility of at least 1 year’s
    duration.  Most
    women with a diagnosis of hypothyroidism had
    ovulatory dysfunction.
    When their hypothyroidism was treated, 64%
    were able to become pregnant. 
    Thus infertile women with ovulatory
    dysfunction should be screened for hypothyroidism.

       

    Many
    clinicians measure TSH and prolactin levels in all
    women with a history of infertility who wish to
    conceive in this study, fewer than 1% of infertile
    women with normal ovulatory cycles had an elevated
    TSH level.  None
    of these women conceived after being treated with
    levothyroxine. However, 7 of 11 women with evidence of ovulatory dysfunction and
    elevated TSH levels conceived after being treated
    with levothyroxine. Thus,
    it appears cost-effective to measure TSH levels in
    infertile women without regular ovulatory cycles so
    as to detect and treat subclinical hypothyroidism.

        


    The benefit of measuring TSH, as well
    as prolactin, in infertile women with regular
    ovulatory cycles remain to be established. 
    If either of these assays is abnormal in
    women with regular ovulatory menstrual cycles,
    treatment with bromocriptine or levothyroixne has
    not been shown to improve fecundity.

        

 



 

 

Speciality Spotlight

 

 
Endocrinology
   

  

Infertility
      

  • SR Lincoln, et al (Univ of Tenessee, Memphis)  
    Screening for Hypothyroidism in Infertile women
    J Reprod Med  44: 455-457, 1999.
        
    Background – Previous research has suggested that infertility is closely associated with hypothyroidism.  However, the incidence of hypothyroidism in infertile women is estimated to be less than 1%, and many clinicians  question the value of including routine screening for hypothyroidism as part of the infertility assessment. The frequency of increased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in patients with a history of infertility seen at reproductive endocrinology and infertility centers was investigated.
         
    Conclusions – The prevalence of increased TSH was 2.3% in this group of women with infertility of at least 1 year’s duration.  Most women with a diagnosis of hypothyroidism had ovulatory dysfunction. When their hypothyroidism was treated, 64% were able to become pregnant.  Thus infertile women with ovulatory dysfunction should be screened for hypothyroidism.
       
    Many clinicians measure TSH and prolactin levels in all women with a history of infertility who wish to conceive in this study, fewer than 1% of infertile women with normal ovulatory cycles had an elevated TSH level.  None of these women conceived after being treated with levothyroxine. However, 7 of 11 women with evidence of ovulatory dysfunction and elevated TSH levels conceived after being treated with levothyroxine. Thus, it appears cost-effective to measure TSH levels in infertile women without regular ovulatory cycles so as to detect and treat subclinical hypothyroidism.
        
    The benefit of measuring TSH, as well as prolactin, in infertile women with regular ovulatory cycles remain to be established.  If either of these assays is abnormal in women with regular ovulatory menstrual cycles, treatment with bromocriptine or levothyroixne has not been shown to improve fecundity.
        

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:42:18+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Infertility

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