Speciality
Spotlight

   




 

Family Practice

 

     




Sunscreen

  

  • Sun
    Exposure

    Naylor MF, Farmer KC [Univ of
    Oklahoma, Oklahoma City]

    The Case for Sunscreens : A
    Review of Their Use in
    Preventing Actinic Damage and
    Neoplasia


    Arch Dermatol 133: 1146-1154,
    1997

      


    Sunscreens are used to reduce
    or prevent ultraviolet [UV]
    rays from producing skin
    damage by their effect on DNA.
    Faulty DNA repair leads to
    neoplasia. Immunosuppression
    both local and systemic are
    other possible effects of UV
    light. Sunscreens however can
    produce skin alterations and
    by blocking sunlight lead to
    vitamin D deficiency. Their
    usefulness has been shown in
    melanoma prevention in
    Australia as indicated by
    lowering its incidence and
    mortality. Cutaneous cancer
    prone races and individuals
    should be thus protected.
    2-Ethylhexyl p-methoxycinnamate
    has been mentioned as one of
    the sunscreens.

         
  • Eberlein-Konig
    B, Placzek M, Przybilla B [
    Dermatologische Klinik und
    Poliklinik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat
    Munchen, Munich]

    Protective Effect against
    Sunburn of Combined Systemic
    Ascorbic Acid [Vitamin C] and
    d-a-Tocopherol [Vitamin E]


    J Am Acad Dermatol 38: 45-48,
    1998

      


    Antioxidants administered to
    reduce damage by free radical
    oxygen species is described.
    20 normal white subjects
    including 4 women were given a
    minimal erythema producing
    dose of UVB light for 8 days
    [Age 23-46 years]. 12 areas of
    the lower back were thus
    studied. Using a double-blind
    method, either a placebo or
    2000 mgm of vitamin C and 1000
    IU of vitamin E were given
    orally during the study period
    of eight days.

      


    The minimal erythema producing
    dose of UVB increased in the
    treated group from 80 to 96.5
    mJ/cm2. In the controls
    reduction from 80-68.5 mJ/cm2
    was observed. This fall is
    described as a priming effect.

      


    These observations suggest
    that these vitamin supplements
    should be used to improve the
    effects of sunscreens rather
    as replacements.

        
  • Sunscreens
    – Contact and Photocontact Dermatitis

    Schauder S, Ippen H [ Univ of Gottingen, Germany]

    Contact and Photocontact Sensitivity to Sunscreens: Review of a 15-Year Experience and of the Literature

    Contact Dermatitis 37 : 221-232, 1997

         

    Sunscreens contain UV absorbers, fragrances, emollients, and preservatives. Dermatitic expression may occur to any of these.

        

    Over a 15 year period ending 1996, 402 consecutive individuals were subjected to patch tests and photopatch tests upon a suspicion of photosensitivity. Before this minimum erythema doses of UV-A and UV-B were established.

        

    175 subjects exhibited either type of reaction and in 80 patients including 28 men between 11-80 years the reaction was confirmed. Of the 175 reactors 102 were induced by UV-A absorbers [ showing greater reactivity] and 73 due to UV-B [milder reacting group] in the splitting below [a] indicates an allergic reaction and [pa] photo allergic phenomena. Dibenzoylmethanes revealed 30[a] and 32 [pa], benzophenones 3[a] and 9[pa], cinnamates 3[a] and 4[pa], terephthalylidene 1[pa], aminobenbenzoates 3[a] and 4 [pa], methylbenzylidene camphor 32 [a] and 5 [pa], and phenylbenzimidazole sulfonic acid 1[a] and 7 [pa]. Reactions; fragrance allergies [ 47 patients] revealed 178 [a] and 14 [pa] responses.

         

    Reactions to sunscreens can be to active ingredients, fragrances and Lanolin.

        


 



 

    

Speciality Spotlight

   

     

Sunscreen
  

  • Sun Exposure
    Naylor MF, Farmer KC [Univ of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City]
    The Case for Sunscreens : A Review of Their Use in Preventing Actinic Damage and Neoplasia
    Arch Dermatol 133: 1146-1154, 1997
      
    Sunscreens are used to reduce or prevent ultraviolet [UV] rays from producing skin damage by their effect on DNA. Faulty DNA repair leads to neoplasia. Immunosuppression both local and systemic are other possible effects of UV light. Sunscreens however can produce skin alterations and by blocking sunlight lead to vitamin D deficiency. Their usefulness has been shown in melanoma prevention in Australia as indicated by lowering its incidence and mortality. Cutaneous cancer prone races and individuals should be thus protected. 2-Ethylhexyl p-methoxycinnamate has been mentioned as one of the sunscreens.
         
  • Eberlein-Konig B, Placzek M, Przybilla B [ Dermatologische Klinik und Poliklinik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat Munchen, Munich]
    Protective Effect against Sunburn of Combined Systemic Ascorbic Acid [Vitamin C] and d-a-Tocopherol [Vitamin E]
    J Am Acad Dermatol 38: 45-48, 1998
      
    Antioxidants administered to reduce damage by free radical oxygen species is described. 20 normal white subjects including 4 women were given a minimal erythema producing dose of UVB light for 8 days [Age 23-46 years]. 12 areas of the lower back were thus studied. Using a double-blind method, either a placebo or 2000 mgm of vitamin C and 1000 IU of vitamin E were given orally during the study period of eight days.
      
    The minimal erythema producing dose of UVB increased in the treated group from 80 to 96.5 mJ/cm2. In the controls reduction from 80-68.5 mJ/cm2 was observed. This fall is described as a priming effect.
      
    These observations suggest that these vitamin supplements should be used to improve the effects of sunscreens rather as replacements.
        
  • Sunscreens – Contact and Photocontact Dermatitis
    Schauder S, Ippen H [ Univ of Gottingen, Germany]
    Contact and Photocontact Sensitivity to Sunscreens: Review of a 15-Year Experience and of the Literature
    Contact Dermatitis 37 : 221-232, 1997
         
    Sunscreens contain UV absorbers, fragrances, emollients, and preservatives. Dermatitic expression may occur to any of these.
        
    Over a 15 year period ending 1996, 402 consecutive individuals were subjected to patch tests and photopatch tests upon a suspicion of photosensitivity. Before this minimum erythema doses of UV-A and UV-B were established.
        
    175 subjects exhibited either type of reaction and in 80 patients including 28 men between 11-80 years the reaction was confirmed. Of the 175 reactors 102 were induced by UV-A absorbers [ showing greater reactivity] and 73 due to UV-B [milder reacting group] in the splitting below [a] indicates an allergic reaction and [pa] photo allergic phenomena. Dibenzoylmethanes revealed 30[a] and 32 [pa], benzophenones 3[a] and 9[pa], cinnamates 3[a] and 4[pa], terephthalylidene 1[pa], aminobenbenzoates 3[a] and 4 [pa], methylbenzylidene camphor 32 [a] and 5 [pa], and phenylbenzimidazole sulfonic acid 1[a] and 7 [pa]. Reactions; fragrance allergies [ 47 patients] revealed 178 [a] and 14 [pa] responses.
         
    Reactions to sunscreens can be to active ingredients, fragrances and Lanolin.
        

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:43:19+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Sunscreen

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