Speciality
Spotlight

       




 


Medicine


   

 




Catheter
Associated Infections

  

  • RO
    Darouiche, for the Catheter Study Group (Baylor
    College of Medicine, Houston; et al)

    A
    Comparison of Two Antimicrobial-Impregnated Central
    Venous Catheters.

    N
    Engl J Med 340: 1-8, 1999.

       

    A
    study of 2611 catheters (central venous) showed that
    impregnation with chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine reduced the incidence of catheter
    colonization and catheter associated bloodstream
    infections.

       

    A
    direct comparison was made between catheter
    associated infections using minocycline/rifampin or
    chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine impregnated
    catheters. A central venous catheter kept for more
    than 3 days, the catheter colonization rate was 8.3%
    in the minocycline/rifampin group as compared to
    22.8%  in the chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine group.
    Both impregnated groups were better than
    non-impregnated catheters.

        

    But to note that the minocycline/rifampin catheters
    were impregnated both externally and internally as
    compared to chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine
    catheters, which were coated only externally.

        

  • F
    Blot, E Schmidt, G Nitenberg, et al (Institute
    Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; Unversite Paris
    XI) : 

    Earlier positivity of Central-Venous-Versus
    Peripheral-Blood Cultures is Highly Predictive of
    Catheter-Related Sepsis. 

    J Clin Microbiol 36: 105-109, 1998.

       

    Central venous catheter (CVC) related infection
    usually requires removal of the catheter. A
    comparison of the material obtained form the
    catheter tip and cultures of blood drawn
    simultaneously showed that this may be a reliable
    method for diagnosis of catheter related sepsis with
    indwelling catheters.

       

 



 

           

Speciality Spotlight

       

 
Medicine
   

 

Catheter Associated Infections
  

  • RO Darouiche, for the Catheter Study Group (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston; et al)
    A Comparison of Two Antimicrobial-Impregnated Central Venous Catheters.
    N Engl J Med 340: 1-8, 1999.
       
    A study of 2611 catheters (central venous) showed that impregnation with chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine reduced the incidence of catheter colonization and catheter associated bloodstream infections.
       
    A direct comparison was made between catheter associated infections using minocycline/rifampin or chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine impregnated catheters. A central venous catheter kept for more than 3 days, the catheter colonization rate was 8.3% in the minocycline/rifampin group as compared to 22.8%  in the chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine group. Both impregnated groups were better than non-impregnated catheters.
        
    But to note that the minocycline/rifampin catheters were impregnated both externally and internally as compared to chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine catheters, which were coated only externally.
        

  • F Blot, E Schmidt, G Nitenberg, et al (Institute Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; Unversite Paris XI) : 
    Earlier positivity of Central-Venous-Versus Peripheral-Blood Cultures is Highly Predictive of Catheter-Related Sepsis. 
    J Clin Microbiol 36: 105-109, 1998.
       
    Central venous catheter (CVC) related infection usually requires removal of the catheter. A comparison of the material obtained form the catheter tip and cultures of blood drawn simultaneously showed that this may be a reliable method for diagnosis of catheter related sepsis with indwelling catheters.
       

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:41:07+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Catheter Associated Infections

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