Speciality
Spotlight

 




 


Neonatal & Perinatal


    

 




Infectious Diseases and Developmental Immunology

  

  • B
    Jonsson, M Rylander, (Karolinska Hosp, Stockholm)


    Ureaplasma urealyticum, Erythromycin and Respiratory Morbidity in High-Risk Preterm Neonates.


    Acta Paediatr 87: 1079-1084, 1998.

      


    Ureaplasma urealyticum (Uu) often colonizes the lungs of very premature infants (less than 30 weeks’ gestation). The relationships between Uu colonization and respiratory morbidity or chronic lung disease (CLD) in very premature infants were studied; whether Uu treatment with erythromycin would have an effect on morbidity was also assessed.

       



    Findings:
    Compared with infants without Uu colonization, infants colonized with Uu were significantly younger (25 vs 26 weeks’ gestation), and their mothers were significantly more likely to have premature rupture of membranes (PROM 48% vs 12%), chorioamnionitis (46% vs 17%), and vaginal delivery (71% vs 29%). Use of supplemental oxygen at 36 weeks’ postconceptual age was also significantly more common in the colonized infants.

      



    Conclusion
    : Ureaplasma urelayticum colonization was related to immaturity, PROM, chorioamnionitis, and vaginal delivery. However Uu colonization was not a significant independent predictor of the need for supplemental oxygen at 36 weeks’ postconceptual age. Similarly, treatment of colonized infants with erythromycin tended to eradicate their infection but had no effect on their supplemental oxygen needs. Thus, if Uu does play an important role in the development of chronic lung disease in very premature infants, its influence probably occurs very early in lung development and would have to be treated early, possibly in utero.

       


    Editorial comments: Uu is somehow related to prematurity and chorioamnionitis but should not necessarily be implicated in chronic lung disease. Furthermore, administration of erythromycin reduces colonization but not duration of oxygen therapy.

       

  • Deficiency of the
    Humoral Immune Response to Measles Vaccine in
    Infants Immunised at Age 6 months

    Gans
    HA, Arvin AM, Galinus J, et al (Stanford Univ, Calif;
    Palo Alto Med Found, Calif)

    JAMA
    280: 527- 532, 1998

     

    Measles
    vaccine is given to children aged between 12 to 15
    months. Women, who had natural measles as a child,
    had high titers of measles antibody that protected
    their infants until about 12 months of their age.
    However, infants of mothers with vaccine induced
    immunity may lose antibodies acquired passively
    before 12 months of their age making them
    susceptible to measles. The present study observed
    that only 50 percent of the 6-month-old infants had
    passive antibodies acquired from their mothers.

     

    Thus,
    the infants between 6 to 12 months of age are
    vulnerable to the infection by the measles virus and
    even the vaccination of these babies will not induce
    antibodies due to immature immune system.


  • The
    Effect of Breast Feeding on Lymphocyte Subpopulation
    in Healthy Term Infants at 6 months of age

    Hawkes JS, Neumann MA, Gibson RA, (Flinders Univ
    of South Australia, Bedford Park, Australia;
    Flinders Med Ctr, Bedford Park, Australia) 

    Pediatr Res 45 ; 648 – 651, 1999



    This study of 148 healthy infants to investigate the
    difference in specific lymphocyte subsets between
    breast fed and formula fed infants. Breast fed
    infants were found to have accelerated development
    of T helper/inducer, T supressor/cytotoxic, and
    natural killer (NK) cells compared with formula fed
    infants. Breast leads to greater maturity in the
    development of the immune system.

       

 



 

 

Speciality Spotlight

 

 

Infectious Diseases and Developmental Immunology
  

  • B Jonsson, M Rylander, (Karolinska Hosp, Stockholm)
    Ureaplasma urealyticum, Erythromycin and Respiratory Morbidity in High-Risk Preterm Neonates.
    Acta Paediatr 87: 1079-1084, 1998.
      
    Ureaplasma urealyticum (Uu) often colonizes the lungs of very premature infants (less than 30 weeks’ gestation). The relationships between Uu colonization and respiratory morbidity or chronic lung disease (CLD) in very premature infants were studied; whether Uu treatment with erythromycin would have an effect on morbidity was also assessed.
       
    Findings: Compared with infants without Uu colonization, infants colonized with Uu were significantly younger (25 vs 26 weeks’ gestation), and their mothers were significantly more likely to have premature rupture of membranes (PROM 48% vs 12%), chorioamnionitis (46% vs 17%), and vaginal delivery (71% vs 29%). Use of supplemental oxygen at 36 weeks’ postconceptual age was also significantly more common in the colonized infants.
      
    Conclusion : Ureaplasma urelayticum colonization was related to immaturity, PROM, chorioamnionitis, and vaginal delivery. However Uu colonization was not a significant independent predictor of the need for supplemental oxygen at 36 weeks’ postconceptual age. Similarly, treatment of colonized infants with erythromycin tended to eradicate their infection but had no effect on their supplemental oxygen needs. Thus, if Uu does play an important role in the development of chronic lung disease in very premature infants, its influence probably occurs very early in lung development and would have to be treated early, possibly in utero.
       
    Editorial comments: Uu is somehow related to prematurity and chorioamnionitis but should not necessarily be implicated in chronic lung disease. Furthermore, administration of erythromycin reduces colonization but not duration of oxygen therapy.
       

  • Deficiency of the Humoral Immune Response to Measles Vaccine in Infants Immunised at Age 6 months
    Gans HA, Arvin AM, Galinus J, et al (Stanford Univ, Calif; Palo Alto Med Found, Calif)
    JAMA 280: 527- 532, 1998
     
    Measles vaccine is given to children aged between 12 to 15 months. Women, who had natural measles as a child, had high titers of measles antibody that protected their infants until about 12 months of their age. However, infants of mothers with vaccine induced immunity may lose antibodies acquired passively before 12 months of their age making them susceptible to measles. The present study observed that only 50 percent of the 6-month-old infants had passive antibodies acquired from their mothers.
     
    Thus, the infants between 6 to 12 months of age are vulnerable to the infection by the measles virus and even the vaccination of these babies will not induce antibodies due to immature immune system.

  • The Effect of Breast Feeding on Lymphocyte Subpopulation in Healthy Term Infants at 6 months of age
    Hawkes JS, Neumann MA, Gibson RA, (Flinders Univ of South Australia, Bedford Park, Australia; Flinders Med Ctr, Bedford Park, Australia) 
    Pediatr Res 45 ; 648 – 651, 1999

    This study of 148 healthy infants to investigate the difference in specific lymphocyte subsets between breast fed and formula fed infants. Breast fed infants were found to have accelerated development of T helper/inducer, T supressor/cytotoxic, and natural killer (NK) cells compared with formula fed infants. Breast leads to greater maturity in the development of the immune system.
       

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:41:23+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Infectious Diseases and Developmental Immunology

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