Speciality
Spotlight

 




 


Neurology


 

 




Contraception
– Oral Contraceptive Pill

           

  • SM
    Schwartz, et al (Univ of Washington, Seattle;
    Southern California Permanente Med Group, Pasadena,
    Calif; KP Med Care Prgoram, Oakland, Calif; et al) 


    Stroke and Use of Low-dose Oral Contraceptives in Young Women: A Pooled
    Analysis of Two Studies.

    Stroke 29:2277-2284, 1998.

       

    It was concluded that an increased risk of stroke
    was not found among women who use low-dose oral
    contraceptive pills.
    The risk of stroke among users needs to be
    clarified with further studies on the basis of age,
    smoking, obesity, hypertension, or migraine history.

       

    Editorial comments: 
    Combining the data from 2 large case-control
    studies in the states of California and Washington
    indicates the risk of developing either ischemic or
    hemorrhagic stroke is not increased with the use of
    low-dose oral contraception.

      

    Lowering
    the dose of steroids in the formulations as well as
    not prescribing oral contraceptives to women older
    than 35 who smoke as well as those with uncontrolled
    hypertension has eliminated stroke as a risk of
    taking oral contraceptives. 
    The data showing an increased risk of stroke
    in women with migraine headaches who take oral
    contraceptives is of some concern, because nearly
    20% of reproductive age women have migraine
    headaches.
    Many authorities recommend prescribing oral
    contraceptives to women with common migraine but not
    classic migraine.
    Classic migraine is when peripheral
    neurologic symptoms or visual disturbance occurs.

           

 



 

 

Speciality Spotlight

 

 
Neurology
 

 

Contraception – Oral Contraceptive Pill
           

  • SM Schwartz, et al (Univ of Washington, Seattle; Southern California Permanente Med Group, Pasadena, Calif; KP Med Care Prgoram, Oakland, Calif; et al) 
    Stroke and Use of Low-dose Oral Contraceptives in Young Women: A Pooled Analysis of Two Studies.
    Stroke 29:2277-2284, 1998.
       
    It was concluded that an increased risk of stroke was not found among women who use low-dose oral contraceptive pills. The risk of stroke among users needs to be clarified with further studies on the basis of age, smoking, obesity, hypertension, or migraine history.
       
    Editorial comments:  Combining the data from 2 large case-control studies in the states of California and Washington indicates the risk of developing either ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke is not increased with the use of low-dose oral contraception.
      
    Lowering the dose of steroids in the formulations as well as not prescribing oral contraceptives to women older than 35 who smoke as well as those with uncontrolled hypertension has eliminated stroke as a risk of taking oral contraceptives.  The data showing an increased risk of stroke in women with migraine headaches who take oral contraceptives is of some concern, because nearly 20% of reproductive age women have migraine headaches. Many authorities recommend prescribing oral contraceptives to women with common migraine but not classic migraine. Classic migraine is when peripheral neurologic symptoms or visual disturbance occurs.
           

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:44:17+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Contraception – Oral Contraceptive Pill

About the Author: