Speciality
Spotlight

 




 


Neurology


 

 








Parkinson’s
Disease

    

  • D Masterman, A DeSalles, RW Baloh, et al (Univ of
    California, Los Angeles)


    Motor,
    Cognitive, and Behavioral Performance Following
    Unilateral Ventroposterior Pallidotomy for
    Parksinson Disease.


    Arch Neurol 55:
    1201-1208, 1998.
     

     

    Radio frequency ventroposterior pallidotomy (VPP) is
    increasingly used to treat medically refractory
    motor symptoms of Parkinson disease.

     

    Thirty-two patients were studied. None had dementia. Three to six months after surgery, 83% of the
    patients had improved total Unified PD Rating Scale
    Score.


      

    VPP in patients with PD significantly improves motor
    performance and daily level of functioning. Cognition and behaviour in patients without
    dementia are not affected adversely.


       

Supranuclear Palsy Parkinson’s and
Alzheimer’s Disease

      

  • P Santacruz, B UttI, I Litvan, et al (NIH, Bethesda,
    Md)


    Progressive
    Supranuclear Palsy: A Survey of the Disease Course.


    Neurology 50:
    1637-1647, 1998.
     

       

    The course of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP)
    and factors predicting survival time were studied in
    a large, clinically diagnosed series of patients.


       

    61.8% of the deceased group had been male. Men tend to have their disease diagnosed
    later and to have shorter survival times than women.
    The first symptoms to appear were motor and visual, followed
    by emotional and personality problems, cognitive
    impairment and sleep changes.


      

    The symptoms of PSP overlap with Parkinson’s and
    Alzheimer’s diseases, which impairs an accurate
    diagnosis during the early course of the disease.
    PSP remains a devastating disease because of its
    unstoppable course over a 5- to 7- year period.


          

Alzheimer’s
Disease

   

  • C Kawas, S Resnick, A Morrison, et al (Johns Hopkins
    Univ, Baltimore, Md; National Institute of Aging/NIH,
    Baltimore, Md; Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and
    Public Health, Baltimore, Md)

    A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF ESTROGEN REPLACEMENT THERAPY AND THE RISK OF DEVELOPING ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE: THE BALTIMORE LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF AGING. 




    Neurology
    48: 1517-1521, 1997.


      


    Estrogen Replacement Therapy usage appears to confer
    a protective effect regarding development of
    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Estrogen seems to exercise a direct influence
    on brain structure and function.


       

    The study provides encouragement of the development
    of improved attempts to mitigate the risk of AD
    using new agents selective for tissue-specific
    oestrogen receptors.


        

    Twice as many women as men are afflicted with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), possibly because of the decline in estrogen levels after menopause.

        

    ERT (Estrogen Replacement Therapy) usage appears to confer a protective effect regarding development of AD. This study supports conclusions of other studies.

       

    Additional work is necessary to verify the above.

          

 



 

 

Speciality Spotlight

 

 
Neurology
 

 

Parkinson’s Disease
    

  • D Masterman, A DeSalles, RW Baloh, et al (Univ of California, Los Angeles)
    Motor, Cognitive, and Behavioral Performance Following Unilateral Ventroposterior Pallidotomy for Parksinson Disease.
    Arch Neurol 55: 1201-1208, 1998.  
     
    Radio frequency ventroposterior pallidotomy (VPP) is increasingly used to treat medically refractory motor symptoms of Parkinson disease.
     
    Thirty-two patients were studied. None had dementia. Three to six months after surgery, 83% of the patients had improved total Unified PD Rating Scale Score.
      
    VPP in patients with PD significantly improves motor performance and daily level of functioning. Cognition and behaviour in patients without dementia are not affected adversely.
       

Supranuclear Palsy Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s Disease
      

  • P Santacruz, B UttI, I Litvan, et al (NIH, Bethesda, Md)
    Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: A Survey of the Disease Course.
    Neurology 50: 1637-1647, 1998.  
       
    The course of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and factors predicting survival time were studied in a large, clinically diagnosed series of patients.
       
    61.8% of the deceased group had been male. Men tend to have their disease diagnosed later and to have shorter survival times than women. The first symptoms to appear were motor and visual, followed by emotional and personality problems, cognitive impairment and sleep changes.
      
    The symptoms of PSP overlap with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, which impairs an accurate diagnosis during the early course of the disease. PSP remains a devastating disease because of its unstoppable course over a 5- to 7- year period.
          

Alzheimer’s Disease
   

  • C Kawas, S Resnick, A Morrison, et al (Johns Hopkins Univ, Baltimore, Md; National Institute of Aging/NIH, Baltimore, Md; Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Md)
    A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF ESTROGEN REPLACEMENT THERAPY AND THE RISK OF DEVELOPING ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE: THE BALTIMORE LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF AGING. 
    Neurology 48: 1517-1521, 1997.
      
    Estrogen Replacement Therapy usage appears to confer a protective effect regarding development of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Estrogen seems to exercise a direct influence on brain structure and function.
       
    The study provides encouragement of the development of improved attempts to mitigate the risk of AD using new agents selective for tissue-specific oestrogen receptors.
        
    Twice as many women as men are afflicted with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), possibly because of the decline in estrogen levels after menopause.
        
    ERT (Estrogen Replacement Therapy) usage appears to confer a protective effect regarding development of AD. This study supports conclusions of other studies.
       
    Additional work is necessary to verify the above.
          

 

 

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