Speciality
Spotlight

 




 


Oncology


 

 





Choriocarcinoma

    

  • Michael J Secki, Rosemary A Fisher et al (Department of Medical Oncology, Histopathology and Cancer Cell Biology, London, UK)

    Choriocarcinoma and partial hydatidiform moles

    Lancet, vol.356, July 1, 2000, pg.36-39.

         

    Partial hydatidiform moles (PMS) rarely require chemotherapy and have never previously been proven to transform into choriocarcinoma, the most malignant form of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD). Whether women with PMD need human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) follow-up is debated. The authors have investigated whether PMS can transform into choriocarcinoma.

        

    Patients with a PM who developed a subsequent choriocarcinoma were identified from the author’s GTD database. Histology of both PM and ensuing choriocarcinoma was reviewed and flow cytometry used to verify the triploid status of the PMS. Complete hydatidiform moles (CMS) are diploid and nearly always androgenic in origin, whereas PMS are triploid consisting of 1 maternal and 2 paternal sets of chromosomes. To determine whether choriocarcinoma arose from the PM, DNA form the PM and choriocarcinoma in each patient was compared.

       

    Of the 3000 patients with PM, 15 required chemotherapy for persisting GTD. This was identified as choriocarcinoma in 3 cases. 

       

    These results show that PMS can transform into choriocarcinoma. All patients, with suspected PM should be reviewed and if confirmed, need hCG follow-up.

           


 

 



 

 

Speciality Spotlight

 

 

Choriocarcinoma
    

  • Michael J Secki, Rosemary A Fisher et al (Department of Medical Oncology, Histopathology and Cancer Cell Biology, London, UK)
    Choriocarcinoma and partial hydatidiform moles
    Lancet, vol.356, July 1, 2000, pg.36-39.
         
    Partial hydatidiform moles (PMS) rarely require chemotherapy and have never previously been proven to transform into choriocarcinoma, the most malignant form of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD). Whether women with PMD need human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) follow-up is debated. The authors have investigated whether PMS can transform into choriocarcinoma.
        
    Patients with a PM who developed a subsequent choriocarcinoma were identified from the author’s GTD database. Histology of both PM and ensuing choriocarcinoma was reviewed and flow cytometry used to verify the triploid status of the PMS. Complete hydatidiform moles (CMS) are diploid and nearly always androgenic in origin, whereas PMS are triploid consisting of 1 maternal and 2 paternal sets of chromosomes. To determine whether choriocarcinoma arose from the PM, DNA form the PM and choriocarcinoma in each patient was compared.
       
    Of the 3000 patients with PM, 15 required chemotherapy for persisting GTD. This was identified as choriocarcinoma in 3 cases. 
       
    These results show that PMS can transform into choriocarcinoma. All patients, with suspected PM should be reviewed and if confirmed, need hCG follow-up.
           

 

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:43:59+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Choriocarcinoma

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