Speciality
Spotlight

 




 


Oncology


 

 





Ovariam

 

  • IJ Jacobs, SJ Skates, et al (Queen Mary and Westfield College, London; Harvard Med School, Boston)


    Screening for Ovarian Cancer: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.



    Lancet 353: 1207-1210, 1999.


      


    Postmenopausal women aged 45 years and older were randomized to either a screened group or a control group (10,000 participants respectively). The screened group was offered 3 annual screens involving measurement of serum CA-125, pelvic ultrasound if CA-125 was 30 U/ml or more, and referral for gynecologic opinion when ovarian volume was 8.8mL or more on ultrasound.

      


    Results: Of 464 women from the screened group with elevated CA-125, 29 were referred for a gynecologic opinion. Six of these 29 patients had an index cancer and 23 had false positive findings. Thus positive predictive value was 20.7%.

      


    Editorial comment: The study was well conducted, and the authors’ recommendation of a larger trial is warranted in view of the deadly aspects of this disease, but it is not clear that this approach is going to be a major addition to the effort to detect this disease early.


      
  • Schiffenbauer
    YS, Abramovitch R, Meir G, et al [ Weizmann Inst of Science,
    Rehovet, Israel; Meir Hosp, Kfar Saba, Israel; Hebrew
    Univ-Hadassah Med School, Jerusalem]

    Loss of Ovarian Function Promotes Angiogenesis in Human Ovarian Carcinoma

    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 94: 13203-13208, 1997

         

    Menopause of ovariectomy increase the levels of gonadotropins i.e. luteinizing hormone and follicle -stimulating hormone which further lead to increase secretion of vascular endothelial of growth factor thereby enhancing
    angiogenesis. This study demonstrate that this angiogenesis is a possible mechanism for progression of ovarian cancer after menopause and the possible role of hormonal therapy administered at the time when patients with ovarian cancer are in complete remission with induction chemotherapy to suppress the
    gonadotropins.

      
  • JF
    Stratton, P Pharoah, SK Smith, et al [ Addenbrooke’s
    Hosp, Cambridge England; Univ of Cambridge, England,
    Rosie Maternity Hosp, Cambridge, England]

    A Systemiatic Review and Meta-analysis of Family
    History and Risk of Ovarian Cancer


    Br J Obstet Gynaecol 105 : 493-499; 1998

       

    This study is a meta analysis of fifteen studies between
    1979 and 1996 to calculate the risk of relation of
    patients with ovarian cancer of either having or dying
    from ovarian cancer. First degree relations have a
    relative risk of 3.1. Some evidence suggested that this
    relative risk decreases with age. Mothers of patients
    had a relative risk of 1.1 compared to 3.8 for sisters
    & 6.0 for daughters. This study confirms the
    conclusion that women with family history of ovarian
    cancer has a markedly higher risk of ovarian cancer.
    However, this risk is small except for those with more
    than one affected relative, in that situation the risk
    ranged from 3.0% to 23.5%. The editor comments that this
    risk is consistent with an underlying ovarian cancer -
    susceptible genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 which are tumor
    suppressor genes associated with the breast /ovarian
    cancer tumor syndrome and mismatch repair genes
    associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal
    cancer families. The data from this meta-analysis would
    be useful for appropriate counseling of patients with a
    family history of ovarian cancer.

       


 

 



 

 

Speciality Spotlight

 

 

Ovariam
 

  • IJ Jacobs, SJ Skates, et al (Queen Mary and Westfield College, London; Harvard Med School, Boston)
    Screening for Ovarian Cancer: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.
    Lancet 353: 1207-1210, 1999.
      
    Postmenopausal women aged 45 years and older were randomized to either a screened group or a control group (10,000 participants respectively). The screened group was offered 3 annual screens involving measurement of serum CA-125, pelvic ultrasound if CA-125 was 30 U/ml or more, and referral for gynecologic opinion when ovarian volume was 8.8mL or more on ultrasound.
      
    Results: Of 464 women from the screened group with elevated CA-125, 29 were referred for a gynecologic opinion. Six of these 29 patients had an index cancer and 23 had false positive findings. Thus positive predictive value was 20.7%.
      
    Editorial comment: The study was well conducted, and the authors’ recommendation of a larger trial is warranted in view of the deadly aspects of this disease, but it is not clear that this approach is going to be a major addition to the effort to detect this disease early.

      
  • Schiffenbauer YS, Abramovitch R, Meir G, et al [ Weizmann Inst of Science, Rehovet, Israel; Meir Hosp, Kfar Saba, Israel; Hebrew Univ-Hadassah Med School, Jerusalem]
    Loss of Ovarian Function Promotes Angiogenesis in Human Ovarian Carcinoma
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 94: 13203-13208, 1997
         
    Menopause of ovariectomy increase the levels of gonadotropins i.e. luteinizing hormone and follicle -stimulating hormone which further lead to increase secretion of vascular endothelial of growth factor thereby enhancing angiogenesis. This study demonstrate that this angiogenesis is a possible mechanism for progression of ovarian cancer after menopause and the possible role of hormonal therapy administered at the time when patients with ovarian cancer are in complete remission with induction chemotherapy to suppress the gonadotropins.
      
  • JF Stratton, P Pharoah, SK Smith, et al [ Addenbrooke’s Hosp, Cambridge England; Univ of Cambridge, England, Rosie Maternity Hosp, Cambridge, England]
    A Systemiatic Review and Meta-analysis of Family History and Risk of Ovarian Cancer
    Br J Obstet Gynaecol 105 : 493-499; 1998
       
    This study is a meta analysis of fifteen studies between 1979 and 1996 to calculate the risk of relation of patients with ovarian cancer of either having or dying from ovarian cancer. First degree relations have a relative risk of 3.1. Some evidence suggested that this relative risk decreases with age. Mothers of patients had a relative risk of 1.1 compared to 3.8 for sisters & 6.0 for daughters. This study confirms the conclusion that women with family history of ovarian cancer has a markedly higher risk of ovarian cancer. However, this risk is small except for those with more than one affected relative, in that situation the risk ranged from 3.0% to 23.5%. The editor comments that this risk is consistent with an underlying ovarian cancer - susceptible genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 which are tumor suppressor genes associated with the breast /ovarian cancer tumor syndrome and mismatch repair genes associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer families. The data from this meta-analysis would be useful for appropriate counseling of patients with a family history of ovarian cancer.
       

 

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:42:22+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Ovariam

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