Speciality
Spotlight

 




 


Ophthalmology


 

 







Refractive Error, Hypermetropia

 

  • Roxburgh Stuart, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, UK


    The Conundrum of Sweet Hyperopia



    Editorial -Br.I.Ophthalmology, 84(10); 1087-1089


      


    A low degree of myopia (about-2D), is more common in metabolically stable adult diabetics, probably due to an increase in lens thickness and surface curvature.

      


    There has been some controversy about the nature of the changes and underlying causes of transient refractory changes. It has been considered that myopia develops in hyperglycaemia and that following therapy there is an hyperopic shift. However, some investigators have suggested that acute changes may cause either myopia or hyperopia. The study by Okamoto et al in this issue of the BJO (p.1098) is helpful in clarifying some of these issues.

      


    Out of multiple variable factors responsible, Okamoto et al report that the refractive changes are due to a change in the lens refractive index. 

      


    There is no knowledge of the biochemical changes occurring in the diabetic crystalline lens – any hypothesis is based on experimental studies. The lens membranes are permeable to glucose but much less to sugar alcohols such as sorbitol.

      


    Hyperglycemia may affect the permeability of the lens membrane and may influence lens metabolism through yet unknown mechanisms.

      

 



 

 

Speciality Spotlight

 

 

Refractive Error, Hypermetropia
 

  • Roxburgh Stuart, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, UK
    The Conundrum of Sweet Hyperopia
    Editorial -Br.I.Ophthalmology, 84(10); 1087-1089
      
    A low degree of myopia (about-2D), is more common in metabolically stable adult diabetics, probably due to an increase in lens thickness and surface curvature.
      
    There has been some controversy about the nature of the changes and underlying causes of transient refractory changes. It has been considered that myopia develops in hyperglycaemia and that following therapy there is an hyperopic shift. However, some investigators have suggested that acute changes may cause either myopia or hyperopia. The study by Okamoto et al in this issue of the BJO (p.1098) is helpful in clarifying some of these issues.
      
    Out of multiple variable factors responsible, Okamoto et al report that the refractive changes are due to a change in the lens refractive index. 
      
    There is no knowledge of the biochemical changes occurring in the diabetic crystalline lens – any hypothesis is based on experimental studies. The lens membranes are permeable to glucose but much less to sugar alcohols such as sorbitol.
      
    Hyperglycemia may affect the permeability of the lens membrane and may influence lens metabolism through yet unknown mechanisms.
      

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:42:01+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Refractive Error, Hypermetropia

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