Speciality
Spotlight

 




 


Ophthalmology


 

 





Trauma
/
Hyphema

   

  • Y
    Shiuey, MJ Lucarelli (Harvard Med School, Boston;
    Univ of Wisconsin, Madison)

    Traumatic
    Hyphema: Outcomes of Outpatient Management.


    Ophthalmology  105: 851-855, 1998.

        

    Following
    blunt ocular trauma, secondary haemorrhages are
    usually more severe predisposing to
    vision-threatening complications.

       

    This
    is a retrospective study comparing inpatient and
    outpatient management of traumatic hyphema. Over half the patients received oral aminocaproic acid.

       

    The
    rebleed rate between patients who received
    aminocaproic acid and those who did not was not
    significantly different.

        

    There was no significant difference in the rebleed rate of
    patients treated initially as outpatients and others
    who were admitted.

     

  • Oribital injury (Trauma)

       

    C Rene, G E Rose, R Lenthal, I Moseley (Moorfields Eye Hospital, London)

    Major orbital complications of endoscopic sinus surgery

    Br.J. Ophthal, May 2001, 85: 598-603

      

    A retrospective review of 4 cases was undertaken. These patients had severe orbital trauma during endoscopic surgery performed on the paranasal sinuses.

      

    All cases had medical rectus damage, one had injury to the inferior rectus and inferior oblique also. Two patients were blinded due to direct damage to the optic nerve or its blood supply.

         

  • Nawal
    Al-Fadhil, Anil Pathare, Anuradha Ganesh (Department
    of Ophthalmology, The Hospital for Sick Children,
    555 University Ave, Toronto, Ontario, Canada)

    Traumatic Hyphema and Factor XI Deficiency
    (Hemophilia C)


    Arch Ophthalmol., October 2001, Vol. 119(10) Pg.
    1546-1547

         

    This is a case report of a 6-year old Omani boy
    whose hyphema following blunt injury had a delay in
    resolving spontaneously, due to the presence of a
    rare hereditary coagulopathy viz hemophilia C
    (factor XI deficiency).

          

    He was the second child of consanguineous parents.

          

    The child was given tranexamic acid (25 mg/kg per
    dose) 3 times daily as well as fresh frozen plasma
    (10 mL/kg per day) for 5 days.

          

    The hyphema cleared gradually and normal visual
    acuity along with a clear lens and a normal fundus
    were seen.

          

 



 

 

Speciality Spotlight

 

 

Trauma / Hyphema
   

  • Y Shiuey, MJ Lucarelli (Harvard Med School, Boston; Univ of Wisconsin, Madison)
    Traumatic Hyphema: Outcomes of Outpatient Management.
    Ophthalmology  105: 851-855, 1998.
        
    Following blunt ocular trauma, secondary haemorrhages are usually more severe predisposing to vision-threatening complications.
       
    This is a retrospective study comparing inpatient and outpatient management of traumatic hyphema. Over half the patients received oral aminocaproic acid.
       
    The rebleed rate between patients who received aminocaproic acid and those who did not was not significantly different.
        
    There was no significant difference in the rebleed rate of patients treated initially as outpatients and others who were admitted.
     

  • Oribital injury (Trauma)
       
    C Rene, G E Rose, R Lenthal, I Moseley (Moorfields Eye Hospital, London)
    Major orbital complications of endoscopic sinus surgery
    Br.J. Ophthal, May 2001, 85: 598-603
      
    A retrospective review of 4 cases was undertaken. These patients had severe orbital trauma during endoscopic surgery performed on the paranasal sinuses.
      
    All cases had medical rectus damage, one had injury to the inferior rectus and inferior oblique also. Two patients were blinded due to direct damage to the optic nerve or its blood supply.
         

  • Nawal Al-Fadhil, Anil Pathare, Anuradha Ganesh (Department of Ophthalmology, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Ave, Toronto, Ontario, Canada)
    Traumatic Hyphema and Factor XI Deficiency (Hemophilia C)
    Arch Ophthalmol., October 2001, Vol. 119(10) Pg. 1546-1547
         
    This is a case report of a 6-year old Omani boy whose hyphema following blunt injury had a delay in resolving spontaneously, due to the presence of a rare hereditary coagulopathy viz hemophilia C (factor XI deficiency).
          
    He was the second child of consanguineous parents.
          
    The child was given tranexamic acid (25 mg/kg per dose) 3 times daily as well as fresh frozen plasma (10 mL/kg per day) for 5 days.
          
    The hyphema cleared gradually and normal visual acuity along with a clear lens and a normal fundus were seen.
          

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:41:25+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Trauma / Hyphema

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