Speciality
Spotlight

 




 


Ophthalmology


 

 





Therapeutics

   

  • N
    Seider, I Beiran, J Scharf et al (Dept. of Ophth. Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel)               

    Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for resistant ocular Behcet’s disease.        

    BJO; 2001; 85:1287-88         

                    

    In this preliminary study, 6 eyes of 4 patients with ocular Behcet’s disease refractory to steroids and cyclosporin A were treated with a course of intravenous gammaglobulin and followed up for their response to this treatment.   

                        

    In all four patients and all 6 eyes there was good response to gammaglobulin therapy.

       

  • P.A.McKelvie, M. Daniel (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia)

    Impression cytology following mitomycin C therapy for ocular surface squamous neoplasia.

    BJO 2001; 85: 1115-1119

      

    Though topical mitomycin C (MMC) therapy has been used for treatment of ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) since 1994, relatively few studies have reported the cellular changes in ocular surface following
    MMC.

      

    Hence, using Millipore filters at intervals between 4 and 17 weeks after starting MMC, the authors studied impression cytology in 4 patients with OSSN and compared them with pretreatment cytology.

      

    It was found that MMC induced changes of cytomegaly, cytoplasmic vacuolation, nucleomegaly with nuclear wrinkling, and binucleation or multinucleation in some cells in all samples. These changes resembled those seen following radiation therapy in uterine cervix. The predominant form of cell death was apoptosis with fewer cells showing necrosis.

     

    MMC related changes may persist in ocular surface epithelium for at least 8 months following therapy.

       

  • CCK Chan, M Paine, J O’Day (Dept. of Neuro-Ophthalmology, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, Australia)

    Steroid Management in giant cell arteritis

    BJO 2001; 85: 1061-1064

     

    In this retrospective study, the records of 100 consecutive patients with biopsy proved giant cell arteritis (GCA) were reviewed.

     

    Ocular involvement in GCA, is an ophthalmic emergency. If untreated, can progress to permanent loss of vision. Effects of intravenous and oral steroids in GCA were reviewed in 73 patients with visual loss (who were treated).

     

    The management of the patients was studied in the first week after presentation, analyzing (i) types of treatment (ii) dose (iii) effect on visual acuity and (iv)
    compliations.

     

    All patients (except one) had loss of vision due to anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy
    (AION).

     

    23% patients had bilateral eye involvement. Vision improved in 29% by a mean of two Snellen chart times after starting steroids.

     

    Improvement of vision was more (40%) in the group who received IV steroids, compared with those who received oral steroids (13%).

      

 



 

 

Speciality Spotlight

 

 

Therapeutics
   

  • N Seider, I Beiran, J Scharf et al (Dept. of Ophth. Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel)               
    Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for resistant ocular Behcet’s disease.        
    BJO; 2001; 85:1287-88         
                    
    In this preliminary study, 6 eyes of 4 patients with ocular Behcet’s disease refractory to steroids and cyclosporin A were treated with a course of intravenous gammaglobulin and followed up for their response to this treatment.   
                        
    In all four patients and all 6 eyes there was good response to gammaglobulin therapy.
       

  • P.A.McKelvie, M. Daniel (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia)
    Impression cytology following mitomycin C therapy for ocular surface squamous neoplasia.
    BJO 2001; 85: 1115-1119
      
    Though topical mitomycin C (MMC) therapy has been used for treatment of ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) since 1994, relatively few studies have reported the cellular changes in ocular surface following MMC.
      
    Hence, using Millipore filters at intervals between 4 and 17 weeks after starting MMC, the authors studied impression cytology in 4 patients with OSSN and compared them with pretreatment cytology.
      
    It was found that MMC induced changes of cytomegaly, cytoplasmic vacuolation, nucleomegaly with nuclear wrinkling, and binucleation or multinucleation in some cells in all samples. These changes resembled those seen following radiation therapy in uterine cervix. The predominant form of cell death was apoptosis with fewer cells showing necrosis.
     
    MMC related changes may persist in ocular surface epithelium for at least 8 months following therapy.
       

  • CCK Chan, M Paine, J O’Day (Dept. of Neuro-Ophthalmology, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, Australia)
    Steroid Management in giant cell arteritis
    BJO 2001; 85: 1061-1064
     
    In this retrospective study, the records of 100 consecutive patients with biopsy proved giant cell arteritis (GCA) were reviewed.
     
    Ocular involvement in GCA, is an ophthalmic emergency. If untreated, can progress to permanent loss of vision. Effects of intravenous and oral steroids in GCA were reviewed in 73 patients with visual loss (who were treated).
     
    The management of the patients was studied in the first week after presentation, analyzing (i) types of treatment (ii) dose (iii) effect on visual acuity and (iv) compliations.
     
    All patients (except one) had loss of vision due to anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy (AION).
     
    23% patients had bilateral eye involvement. Vision improved in 29% by a mean of two Snellen chart times after starting steroids.
     
    Improvement of vision was more (40%) in the group who received IV steroids, compared with those who received oral steroids (13%).
      

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:41:52+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Therapeutics

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