Speciality
Spotlight

 



 

Orthopaedics

 

 


Hormone
Replacement Therapy
     

  • Hormone Replacement Therapy and
    Risk of Hip Fracture: Population Based Case – Control
    Study.
    Michaelson K, for the Swedish Hip
    Fracture Study Group (Univ Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden;
    Dartmouth Med School, Hanover, NH; Karolinksa Inst,
    Stockholm; et al).  
    BMJ 
    316: 1858-1863, 1998.
        
    Optimal fracture protection
    requires recent HRT use, although treatment can start
    several years after menopause. 
    The protective effect increases with the
    duration of use.  An estrogen-sparing
    effect is achieved when the regimen contains
    progestins.
       
    Editorial comments: There is much
    useful clinical information in this large population
    based, case control epidemiology study. 
    The data indicate that long-term use of
    postmenopausal HRT is necessary to optimally reduce
    the risk of hip fractures. Since hip fractures usually occur after age 70,
    women need to take estrogen at least to this age and
    older as protection against hip fracture disappears 5
    years after stopping HRT. The data also demonstrated greater protection
    against hip fracture when a progestin was added to the
    estrogen.
        

  • Low Dose Estrogen and Calcium
    Have an Additive Effect on Bone Resorption in Older
    Women.

    KM
    Prestwood, DL Thompson, AM Kenny, et al (Univ of Conn,
    Farmington; Univ of Heidelberg, Germany). 
    J Clin Endocrinol Metab 84: 179-183, 1999.
      
    For bone resorption, there is an
    additive effect of low dose estrogen and calcium. 
    However, there was no effect in older women for
    bone formation.  In older women, the
    combination of low dose estrogen plus calcium is
    likely to be more effective than either treatment
    alone.
       
    Editorial comments: The
    results of this short-term study in which markers of
    bone metabolism were measured in older women suggest
    that the addition of calcium supplementation and
    vitamin D to estrogen replacement prevents bone
    resorption to a greater extent than the use of
    estrogen alone.  Clinicians should
    encourage postmenopausal women to ingest between 1200
    and 1500mg of calcium daily and 400 to 800
    international units of vitamin D in addition to taking
    estrogen replacement for maximal prevention of bone
    loss.
             

 


 

         

Speciality Spotlight

 

 
Orthopaedics
 

 

Hormone Replacement Therapy
     

  • Hormone Replacement Therapy and Risk of Hip Fracture: Population Based Case – Control Study.
    Michaelson K, for the Swedish Hip Fracture Study Group (Univ Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden; Dartmouth Med School, Hanover, NH; Karolinksa Inst, Stockholm; et al).   BMJ  316: 1858-1863, 1998.
        
    Optimal fracture protection requires recent HRT use, although treatment can start several years after menopause.  The protective effect increases with the duration of use.  An estrogen-sparing effect is achieved when the regimen contains progestins.
       
    Editorial comments: There is much useful clinical information in this large population based, case control epidemiology study.  The data indicate that long-term use of postmenopausal HRT is necessary to optimally reduce the risk of hip fractures. Since hip fractures usually occur after age 70, women need to take estrogen at least to this age and older as protection against hip fracture disappears 5 years after stopping HRT. The data also demonstrated greater protection against hip fracture when a progestin was added to the estrogen.
        

  • Low Dose Estrogen and Calcium Have an Additive Effect on Bone Resorption in Older Women.
    KM Prestwood, DL Thompson, AM Kenny, et al (Univ of Conn, Farmington; Univ of Heidelberg, Germany).  J Clin Endocrinol Metab 84: 179-183, 1999.
      
    For bone resorption, there is an additive effect of low dose estrogen and calcium.  However, there was no effect in older women for bone formation.  In older women, the combination of low dose estrogen plus calcium is likely to be more effective than either treatment alone.
       
    Editorial comments: The results of this short-term study in which markers of bone metabolism were measured in older women suggest that the addition of calcium supplementation and vitamin D to estrogen replacement prevents bone resorption to a greater extent than the use of estrogen alone.  Clinicians should encourage postmenopausal women to ingest between 1200 and 1500mg of calcium daily and 400 to 800 international units of vitamin D in addition to taking estrogen replacement for maximal prevention of bone loss.
             

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:44:13+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Hormone Replacement Therapy

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