Speciality
Spotlight

 




 

Otolaryngology


 

    

  




External Ear

       

  • BC Becker, Tos M (Univ of Copenhagen).


    Postinflammatory Acquired Atresia of the External Auditory Canal: Treatment and Results of Surgery Over 27 Years.



    Laryngoscope 108:903-907, 1998.


        


    Postinflammatory acquired solid atresia is a consequence of chronic otitis media or recurrent external otitis. This clinical entity is of rare occurrence. Results for 47 patients (53 ears) treated for acquired atresia during 26 years were collected.

       


    In most patients the surgery started as a transcanal operation. Complete removal of the atresia tissue leaves an intact fibrous annulus and lamina propria. The denuded bone is covered with split-skin grafts and the ear canal is packed with Gelfoam and antibiotics are applied.

        


    Hearing improved in most patients. Recurrent atresia developed in 11% patients. The most recent follow-up found 93% of ears to be dry.

        


    Early operation is recommended for this rare condition.

       

  • T Hoshino, Y Ueda, H Mukohdaka, et al (Hamamatsu Univ, Japan)


    Acute Granulomatous Myringitis



    J Laryngol Otol 112: 150-153, 1998


        


    Acute and chronic myringitis seem to be caused by two different entities. 

        


    Acute myringitis manifests the following – otalgia, a granulomatous bulge along the malleus, and no middle ear infection.

        


    Chronic myringitis is characterized by erosion or thin granulation of the tympanic membrane – it can recur after debridement and cautery.

       


    Granulomatous changes of the tympanic membrane are rare. This article describes five causes of acute granulomatous
    myringitis.

       

  • NW Todd (Emory Univ, Atlanta, Ga)


    Cranial Anatomy and Otitis Media : A Cadaver Study



    Am J Otol 19:558


         


    This interesting article is probably the first of its kind correlating cranial anatomical changes and otitis media. Thirty-five cadaver skulls were examined.

         


    Healthy middle ears had longer eustachian tubes, a longer distance from the midsella to the staphylion, and the distance between the ears was longer irrespective of race, gender or stature.


         

 



 

Speciality Spotlight

 

    
  

External Ear
       

  • BC Becker, Tos M (Univ of Copenhagen).
    Postinflammatory Acquired Atresia of the External Auditory Canal: Treatment and Results of Surgery Over 27 Years.
    Laryngoscope 108:903-907, 1998.
        
    Postinflammatory acquired solid atresia is a consequence of chronic otitis media or recurrent external otitis. This clinical entity is of rare occurrence. Results for 47 patients (53 ears) treated for acquired atresia during 26 years were collected.
       
    In most patients the surgery started as a transcanal operation. Complete removal of the atresia tissue leaves an intact fibrous annulus and lamina propria. The denuded bone is covered with split-skin grafts and the ear canal is packed with Gelfoam and antibiotics are applied.
        
    Hearing improved in most patients. Recurrent atresia developed in 11% patients. The most recent follow-up found 93% of ears to be dry.
        
    Early operation is recommended for this rare condition.
       

  • T Hoshino, Y Ueda, H Mukohdaka, et al (Hamamatsu Univ, Japan)
    Acute Granulomatous Myringitis
    J Laryngol Otol 112: 150-153, 1998
        
    Acute and chronic myringitis seem to be caused by two different entities. 
        
    Acute myringitis manifests the following – otalgia, a granulomatous bulge along the malleus, and no middle ear infection.
        
    Chronic myringitis is characterized by erosion or thin granulation of the tympanic membrane – it can recur after debridement and cautery.
       
    Granulomatous changes of the tympanic membrane are rare. This article describes five causes of acute granulomatous myringitis.
       

  • NW Todd (Emory Univ, Atlanta, Ga)
    Cranial Anatomy and Otitis Media : A Cadaver Study
    Am J Otol 19:558
         
    This interesting article is probably the first of its kind correlating cranial anatomical changes and otitis media. Thirty-five cadaver skulls were examined.
         
    Healthy middle ears had longer eustachian tubes, a longer distance from the midsella to the staphylion, and the distance between the ears was longer irrespective of race, gender or stature.

         

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:43:16+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on External Ear

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