Speciality
Spotlight

 




 

Otolaryngology


 

    

  





Invasive
Fungal Rhinosinusitis

       

  • The
    patient who is immunocomprimized is susceptible to
    invasive fungal rhinosinusitis. Acute or fulminant
    also have been termed for this entity. Fulminant
    conveys the meaning fatal outcomes are seen with
    rapid destruction, if such patients remain untreated
    or else immuno-compromised status is severe or
    irreversible.

       


    In this, vascular invasion is prominent
    histopathologically and the time course is less than
    4 weeks duration.

    The definition of chronic invasive is denoted to
    those findings where duration is more than 4 weeks
    and the vascular invasion is less or absent.

         


    De Shazo et al has subdivided chronic invasive
    fungal disease into granulomatous and non-granulomatous
    histopathology but no difference in prognosis or
    therapy is seen.

       


    The source of immunocompromisation can range from
    severe neutropenia (bone marrow transplant patient),
    organ transplant patients, Diabetes or HIV
    infection.

        


    Diagnosis of Invasive Fungal Rhinosinusitis:

    1) Clinical symptoms of Rhinosinusitis

    2) Inability to raise a WBC count

    3) Presence of actual hyphae present.

    4) Culture – This may take days or weeks to grow.

    5) Biopsy specimens by frozen section to show
    vascular involvement.

       


    The goal of the clinician is to suspect and diagnose
    invasive fungal rhinosinusitis as early as possible
    to institute appropriate therapy.

       


    Systemic antifungal therapy is not required in
    noninvasive form of fungal rhinosinusitis. 

       


    Although, Aspergillus species and Mucormycosis,
    especially in diabetes, are the most common
    infective invasive fungal organisms, rarely and
    occasionally nonpathogenic fungal species can cause
    invasive fungal rhinosinusitis.

        


    Out of 20000 fungal species identified in the world,
    250 fungal species have been reported to produce
    human infection.

        


 



 

Speciality Spotlight

 

    
  

Invasive Fungal Rhinosinusitis
       

  • The patient who is immunocomprimized is susceptible to invasive fungal rhinosinusitis. Acute or fulminant also have been termed for this entity. Fulminant conveys the meaning fatal outcomes are seen with rapid destruction, if such patients remain untreated or else immuno-compromised status is severe or irreversible.
       
    In this, vascular invasion is prominent histopathologically and the time course is less than 4 weeks duration.
    The definition of chronic invasive is denoted to those findings where duration is more than 4 weeks and the vascular invasion is less or absent.
         
    De Shazo et al has subdivided chronic invasive fungal disease into granulomatous and non-granulomatous histopathology but no difference in prognosis or therapy is seen.
       
    The source of immunocompromisation can range from severe neutropenia (bone marrow transplant patient), organ transplant patients, Diabetes or HIV infection.
        
    Diagnosis of Invasive Fungal Rhinosinusitis:
    1) Clinical symptoms of Rhinosinusitis
    2) Inability to raise a WBC count
    3) Presence of actual hyphae present.
    4) Culture – This may take days or weeks to grow.
    5) Biopsy specimens by frozen section to show vascular involvement.
       
    The goal of the clinician is to suspect and diagnose invasive fungal rhinosinusitis as early as possible to institute appropriate therapy.
       
    Systemic antifungal therapy is not required in noninvasive form of fungal rhinosinusitis. 
       
    Although, Aspergillus species and Mucormycosis, especially in diabetes, are the most common infective invasive fungal organisms, rarely and occasionally nonpathogenic fungal species can cause invasive fungal rhinosinusitis.
        
    Out of 20000 fungal species identified in the world, 250 fungal species have been reported to produce human infection.
        

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:43:13+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Invasive Fungal Rhinosinusitis

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