Speciality
Spotlight

 




 

Otolaryngology


 

    

  




Tympanostomy

     

  • Detroit; Pediatric Ear, Nose and Throat of Indiana, Indianapolis)


    Phenylephrine and the Prevention of Postoperative Tympanostomy Tube Obstruction.



    Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 124: 1233-1236, 1998.


      


    Insertion of tympanostomy tubes for otitis media has provoked a lot of controversy. Anatomical or physiological abnormalities of the eustachian tube or middle ear mucosa are believed to cause otitis media with effusion. Tympanostomy tubes help to equalize middle ear pressure and allow fluid to drain.

      


    However in 36% of patients the tympanostomy tubes developed obstruction. The efficacy of phenylephrine hydrochloride in preventing post-myringotomy tympanic tube obstruction was assessed.

      


    It was found that incidence of tube obstruction is greatly reduced by the use of phenylephrine (along with topical antibiotics).

      

  • RD Eavey (Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston; Harvard Med School)


    Inlay Tympanoplasty: Cartilage Butterfly Technique



    Laryngoscope 108: 657-661, 1998.


      


    The results of a transcanal cartilage butterfly inlay technique are described in nine patients, aged 6 to 19 years. Tragal cartilage is harvested with the perichondrium preserved on both surfaces. Exposed malleus and tympanosclerotic plaques interlock with the graft.

       


    The technique is effective for closing small to medium-sized tympanic membrane perforations.

       

  • GO Te, FM Rizer, AG Schuring (Warren Otologic Group, Ohio)


    Pediatric Tympanoplasty of Iatrogenic Perforations from Ventilation Tube Therapy.



    Am J Otol 19:301-305, 1998.


       


    A retrospective study sought to determine the surgical outcome of tympanoplasty in children with iatrogenic perforations.

       


    The above surgical procedure (tympanoplasty with ventilation tube therapy) has an excellent chance of success in children. Graft-take and hearing results are excellent and complications minimal.

       

  • DM
    Nadel, H Silverstein, MJ Olds (Univ of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Ear Research Found, Sarasota, Fla; Rockwood Clinic, Spokane, Wash)


    A New Prosthesis for Reconstructing the Incudostapedial Joint.



    Am J Otol 18: 540-543, 1997.


       


    The use of a hydroxylapatite prosthesis to rejoin the lenticular process of the incus to the head of the stapes was evaluated.

       


    The Silverstein Incus-Stapes Connection prosthesis whether used alone for small gaps, in combination with an autogenous chip bridge, or as a partial replacement for larger gaps, was useful in bridging gaps between the head of the stapes and the eroded
    incus.

         

  • JS
    Altman, MS Haupert, RA Hamaker, et al (Children’s
    Hosp of Michigan, detroit;
    Pediatric ear,
    Nose and throat
    of Indiana, Indianapolis)

    Phenylephrine
    and the Prevention of Postoperative tympanostomy
    tube
    Obstruction.

    Arch
    Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 124: 1233-1236, 1998.

      

    Insertion
    of tympanostomy tubes for otitis media has provoked
    a lot of controversy.  
    Anatomical or physiological abnormalities of
    the eustachian tube or middle ear mucosa are
    believed to cause otitis media with effusion.
    Tympanostomy tubes help to equalize middle ear
    pressure and allow fluid to drain.

      

    However in 36% of patients the tympanostomy tubes
    developed obstruction. 
    The efficacy of phenylephrine hydrochloride
    in preventing post-myringotomy tympanic tube
    obstruction was assessed.

      

    It was found that incidence of tube obstruction is
    greatly reduced by the use of phenylephrine (along
    with topical antibiotics).


     

        


 



 

Speciality Spotlight

 

    
  

Tympanostomy
     

  • Detroit; Pediatric Ear, Nose and Throat of Indiana, Indianapolis)
    Phenylephrine and the Prevention of Postoperative Tympanostomy Tube Obstruction.
    Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 124: 1233-1236, 1998.
      
    Insertion of tympanostomy tubes for otitis media has provoked a lot of controversy. Anatomical or physiological abnormalities of the eustachian tube or middle ear mucosa are believed to cause otitis media with effusion. Tympanostomy tubes help to equalize middle ear pressure and allow fluid to drain.
      
    However in 36% of patients the tympanostomy tubes developed obstruction. The efficacy of phenylephrine hydrochloride in preventing post-myringotomy tympanic tube obstruction was assessed.
      
    It was found that incidence of tube obstruction is greatly reduced by the use of phenylephrine (along with topical antibiotics).
      

  • RD Eavey (Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston; Harvard Med School)
    Inlay Tympanoplasty: Cartilage Butterfly Technique
    Laryngoscope 108: 657-661, 1998.
      
    The results of a transcanal cartilage butterfly inlay technique are described in nine patients, aged 6 to 19 years. Tragal cartilage is harvested with the perichondrium preserved on both surfaces. Exposed malleus and tympanosclerotic plaques interlock with the graft.
       
    The technique is effective for closing small to medium-sized tympanic membrane perforations.
       

  • GO Te, FM Rizer, AG Schuring (Warren Otologic Group, Ohio)
    Pediatric Tympanoplasty of Iatrogenic Perforations from Ventilation Tube Therapy.
    Am J Otol 19:301-305, 1998.
       
    A retrospective study sought to determine the surgical outcome of tympanoplasty in children with iatrogenic perforations.
       
    The above surgical procedure (tympanoplasty with ventilation tube therapy) has an excellent chance of success in children. Graft-take and hearing results are excellent and complications minimal.
       

  • DM Nadel, H Silverstein, MJ Olds (Univ of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Ear Research Found, Sarasota, Fla; Rockwood Clinic, Spokane, Wash)
    A New Prosthesis for Reconstructing the Incudostapedial Joint.
    Am J Otol 18: 540-543, 1997.
       
    The use of a hydroxylapatite prosthesis to rejoin the lenticular process of the incus to the head of the stapes was evaluated.
       
    The Silverstein Incus-Stapes Connection prosthesis whether used alone for small gaps, in combination with an autogenous chip bridge, or as a partial replacement for larger gaps, was useful in bridging gaps between the head of the stapes and the eroded incus.
         

  • JS Altman, MS Haupert, RA Hamaker, et al (Children’s Hosp of Michigan, detroit; Pediatric ear, Nose and throat of Indiana, Indianapolis)
    Phenylephrine and the Prevention of Postoperative tympanostomy tube Obstruction.
    Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 124: 1233-1236, 1998.
      
    Insertion of tympanostomy tubes for otitis media has provoked a lot of controversy.   Anatomical or physiological abnormalities of the eustachian tube or middle ear mucosa are believed to cause otitis media with effusion. Tympanostomy tubes help to equalize middle ear pressure and allow fluid to drain.
      
    However in 36% of patients the tympanostomy tubes developed obstruction.  The efficacy of phenylephrine hydrochloride in preventing post-myringotomy tympanic tube obstruction was assessed.
      
    It was found that incidence of tube obstruction is greatly reduced by the use of phenylephrine (along with topical antibiotics).

     
        

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:43:23+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Tympanostomy

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