Speciality
Spotlight

   




 

Radiology

 

    






Cochlear Implants

         

  • S. Youssefzadeh, W Baumgartner, R Dorffner, et al (Univ of Vienna)


    MR Compatibility of Med EL Cochlear Implants: Clinical Testing at 1.0T.


    J Comput Assist Tomogr 22: 346-350, 1998.

     


    Magnetic resonance imaging is likely to be indicated in patients with cochlear implants. The effects of MRI on the Med EL implant were assessed in vitro and in vivo.

     


    Patients undergoing MRI experienced no adverse reactions. All the explanted cochlear implants retained their function.

     


    It was concluded that Med EL cochlear implantation is not a FIRM contraindication for MRI. However, in view of variations in fixation methods, implant types, and MR units, the current data do not suggest overall safety of MRI in ALL patients with cochlear implants.

  • NH Blevins, BL Carter (Tufts-New England Med Ctr, Boston)


    Clinical Forum: Routine Preoperative Imaging in Chronic Ear Surgery,


    Am J Otol 19: 527-538, 1998.

          


    Imaging studies, especially CT, can demonstrate the nature and extent of chronic otitis media, which may not be apparent on clinical findings per se. Such findings can affect operative treatment, especially in difficult and/or revision procedures. However, there is a view that routine radiography of the mastoid may suffice in being very helpful in most cases.

         

  • JP
    Leonetti, T Origitano, et al (Loyola Univ, Maywood, III)


    Intracranial Complications of Temporal Bone Osteoradionecrosis


    Am J Otol 18:223-229, 1997

       


    Osteoradionecrosis of the temporal bone may follow radiation to the brain, parotid gland, nasopharynx, or superior cervical area. Life-threatening intracranial complications may follow.

       


    In 4 patients studied, complications observed were multiple brain abscesses, aneurysm of the internal carotid artery; a cholesteatoma of the external auditory canal with extensive destruction of the mastoid bone leading to thrombosis and meningitis of the sigmoid sinus; meningitis with a small epidural abscess over the middle fossa dura; and prolonged infection of the ear canal, middle ear, and mastoid resulting in fatal otitic meningitis. The 3 patients who underwent surgery (mastoid) survived requiring careful and regular follow-up.

       

  • T
    Johkoh, H Itoh, NL Muller, et al (Osaka Univ, Japan; Univ of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; Kyoto Univ, Japan et al)


    Crazy-paving Appearance at Thin-Section CT: Spectrum of Disease and Pathologic Findings.


    Radiology 211: 155-160, 1999.

       


    The crazy-paving pattern noted on some thin-section CT scans is a fine reticular pattern superimposed on a background of ground-glass opacity. The diseases that are associated with this pattern and the pathologic findings that cause this appearance were identified.

       


    Total of 5123 patients who underwent thin-CT scans only 46 patients showed the crazy-paving pattern. Of which 15 different diseases, including 8 with adult respiratory distress syndrome, (ARDS) were found to be causative for these 46 patients with the said crazy-paving pattern.

        


    The study concluded that the crazy-paving pattern is a nonspecific pattern seen in numerous types of interstitial and alveolar lung diseases and that it is not associated with thickening of the interlobular septa or the presence of intralobular fibrosis. Thus Johkoh et al nicely demonstrate the nonspecificity of this CT finding.

        
             

   



 

 

Speciality Spotlight

   

 
Radiology
 

    

Cochlear Implants
         

  • S. Youssefzadeh, W Baumgartner, R Dorffner, et al (Univ of Vienna)
    MR Compatibility of Med EL Cochlear Implants: Clinical Testing at 1.0T.
    J Comput Assist Tomogr 22: 346-350, 1998.
     
    Magnetic resonance imaging is likely to be indicated in patients with cochlear implants. The effects of MRI on the Med EL implant were assessed in vitro and in vivo.
     
    Patients undergoing MRI experienced no adverse reactions. All the explanted cochlear implants retained their function.
     
    It was concluded that Med EL cochlear implantation is not a FIRM contraindication for MRI. However, in view of variations in fixation methods, implant types, and MR units, the current data do not suggest overall safety of MRI in ALL patients with cochlear implants.

  • NH Blevins, BL Carter (Tufts-New England Med Ctr, Boston)
    Clinical Forum: Routine Preoperative Imaging in Chronic Ear Surgery,
    Am J Otol 19: 527-538, 1998.
          
    Imaging studies, especially CT, can demonstrate the nature and extent of chronic otitis media, which may not be apparent on clinical findings per se. Such findings can affect operative treatment, especially in difficult and/or revision procedures. However, there is a view that routine radiography of the mastoid may suffice in being very helpful in most cases.
         

  • JP Leonetti, T Origitano, et al (Loyola Univ, Maywood, III)
    Intracranial Complications of Temporal Bone Osteoradionecrosis
    Am J Otol 18:223-229, 1997
       
    Osteoradionecrosis of the temporal bone may follow radiation to the brain, parotid gland, nasopharynx, or superior cervical area. Life-threatening intracranial complications may follow.
       
    In 4 patients studied, complications observed were multiple brain abscesses, aneurysm of the internal carotid artery; a cholesteatoma of the external auditory canal with extensive destruction of the mastoid bone leading to thrombosis and meningitis of the sigmoid sinus; meningitis with a small epidural abscess over the middle fossa dura; and prolonged infection of the ear canal, middle ear, and mastoid resulting in fatal otitic meningitis. The 3 patients who underwent surgery (mastoid) survived requiring careful and regular follow-up.
       

  • T Johkoh, H Itoh, NL Muller, et al (Osaka Univ, Japan; Univ of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; Kyoto Univ, Japan et al)
    Crazy-paving Appearance at Thin-Section CT: Spectrum of Disease and Pathologic Findings.
    Radiology 211: 155-160, 1999.
       
    The crazy-paving pattern noted on some thin-section CT scans is a fine reticular pattern superimposed on a background of ground-glass opacity. The diseases that are associated with this pattern and the pathologic findings that cause this appearance were identified.
       
    Total of 5123 patients who underwent thin-CT scans only 46 patients showed the crazy-paving pattern. Of which 15 different diseases, including 8 with adult respiratory distress syndrome, (ARDS) were found to be causative for these 46 patients with the said crazy-paving pattern.
        
    The study concluded that the crazy-paving pattern is a nonspecific pattern seen in numerous types of interstitial and alveolar lung diseases and that it is not associated with thickening of the interlobular septa or the presence of intralobular fibrosis. Thus Johkoh et al nicely demonstrate the nonspecificity of this CT finding.
        
             

   

 

By |2022-07-20T16:41:52+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Cochlear Implants

About the Author: