Speciality
Spotlight

 




 


Respiratory – Pulmonary – Asthma


 

 





Community Acquired Pneumonia

 

  • LA Jackson, P Benson, V-P Sneller, et al (Univ of Washington, Seattle; Ctrs for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga)


    Safety of Revaccination with Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine.


    JAMA 281: 243-248, 1999.

       


    Vaccination with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysacharide vaccine for all persons 65 years or older and for younger persons with medical conditions that are associated with an increased risk of serious penumococcal disease has been recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to prevent invasive pneumococcal disease. A one-time revaccination after 5 or more years is also recommended for those above 65 who were vaccinated before age 65 and for previously vaccinated persons under 65 years who are immunocompromised because of underlying medical conditions or medications

        


    Antipneumococcal vaccine is a second major component of the fight against increasing pneumococcal resistance. One of the biggest questions based in clinical practice is whether I should revaccinate my patients or not especially if there is a chance of increased adverse event. This study shows that in patients immunized at least 5 years previously, there was a somewhat increased risk of local reactions, but these were self-limited and although the patients must be informed of the potential risk for local reaction, this should not be considered a reason not to vaccinate as we have seen the benefits far outweigh the risks of the vaccination.

        


 



 

 

Speciality Spotlight

 

 

Community Acquired Pneumonia
 

  • LA Jackson, P Benson, V-P Sneller, et al (Univ of Washington, Seattle; Ctrs for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga)
    Safety of Revaccination with Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine.
    JAMA 281: 243-248, 1999.
       
    Vaccination with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysacharide vaccine for all persons 65 years or older and for younger persons with medical conditions that are associated with an increased risk of serious penumococcal disease has been recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to prevent invasive pneumococcal disease. A one-time revaccination after 5 or more years is also recommended for those above 65 who were vaccinated before age 65 and for previously vaccinated persons under 65 years who are immunocompromised because of underlying medical conditions or medications
        
    Antipneumococcal vaccine is a second major component of the fight against increasing pneumococcal resistance. One of the biggest questions based in clinical practice is whether I should revaccinate my patients or not especially if there is a chance of increased adverse event. This study shows that in patients immunized at least 5 years previously, there was a somewhat increased risk of local reactions, but these were self-limited and although the patients must be informed of the potential risk for local reaction, this should not be considered a reason not to vaccinate as we have seen the benefits far outweigh the risks of the vaccination.
        

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:41:49+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Community Acquired Pneumonia

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