Speciality
Spotlight

 




 


Respiratory – Pulmonary – Asthma


 

 





Lung Volume

  

  • G.
    Criner, FC Cordova, V Leyenson, et al, 1998. (Temple Univ., Philadelphia):

    Effect of Lung Volume Reduction Surgery on Diaphragm Strength. 


    Am. J Respir. Crit Care Med 157: 1578-1585

      


    Lung volume reduction surgery significantly enhances diaphragmatic strength that is associated with a decrease in lung volumes and an improved exercise performance – leading to prolonged improved functional status of patients undergoing procedure.

        


    In the group of patients who underwent only pulmonary rehabilitation, there was no change in the measurement of diaphragmatic strength.

        

  • Quekel LGBA, Kessels AGH, Goei R, et al


    Miss Rate of Lung Cancer on the Chest Radiograph in Clinical Practice


    Chest 115: 720-724, 1999

       


    Despite best efforts, some Non Small Cell Lung Cancer [NSCLC] tumours are missed on chest radiographs. The miss rate for these tumours and the resultant implications for prognosis were evaluated. 

       


    Medical records and chest radiographs were retrospectively reviewed for 396 patients who were treated for primary NSCLC. Two independent radiologists reviewed all chest radiographs to determine whether any lesions had been missed in earlier radiographs, if a previously missed lesion was identified, a third independent radiologist confirmed its presence. 

       


    The time between the first appearance of the lesion on the chest radiograph and the date of histopathologic diagnosis was calculated to measure the delay in diagnosis. Findings showed that NSCLC presented as a nodular lesion in 259 of the 396 patients [65.4%]; the lesion was definitely missed in 49 [19%]; in fact the lesion was missed twice on consecutive chest radiographs in 16 patients and 6 patients it was missed 3 times or more.

       


    Location of the tumour did not influence the miss rate. However superimposing structures were significantly more common in the patients with missed lesions [71% vs 2%]. Additionally missed lesions were significantly smaller [median diameters 16 vs 40 mms]; most of the lesions 10 mms or less were missed in 71%.

        


    The median delay in the diagnosis of missed lesions was 472 days which was significantly longer than the 29 days for diagnosis of detected lesions. The extra delay resulted in the conversion of the tumours from stage T1 to T2 in 21 patients with missed lesions [43%]. Of the remaining 28 patients with missed lesions 22 continued to remain in stage T1 and 6 in stage T2.

      


    The authors conclude that miss rate of 19% [in other reported series from 20% to 50%] has a definite impact on prognosis and therefore remains a cause of concern.


        


 



 

 

Speciality Spotlight

 

 

Lung Volume
  

  • G. Criner, FC Cordova, V Leyenson, et al, 1998. (Temple Univ., Philadelphia):
    Effect of Lung Volume Reduction Surgery on Diaphragm Strength. 
    Am. J Respir. Crit Care Med 157: 1578-1585
      
    Lung volume reduction surgery significantly enhances diaphragmatic strength that is associated with a decrease in lung volumes and an improved exercise performance – leading to prolonged improved functional status of patients undergoing procedure.
        
    In the group of patients who underwent only pulmonary rehabilitation, there was no change in the measurement of diaphragmatic strength.
        

  • Quekel LGBA, Kessels AGH, Goei R, et al
    Miss Rate of Lung Cancer on the Chest Radiograph in Clinical Practice
    Chest 115: 720-724, 1999
       
    Despite best efforts, some Non Small Cell Lung Cancer [NSCLC] tumours are missed on chest radiographs. The miss rate for these tumours and the resultant implications for prognosis were evaluated. 
       
    Medical records and chest radiographs were retrospectively reviewed for 396 patients who were treated for primary NSCLC. Two independent radiologists reviewed all chest radiographs to determine whether any lesions had been missed in earlier radiographs, if a previously missed lesion was identified, a third independent radiologist confirmed its presence. 
       
    The time between the first appearance of the lesion on the chest radiograph and the date of histopathologic diagnosis was calculated to measure the delay in diagnosis. Findings showed that NSCLC presented as a nodular lesion in 259 of the 396 patients [65.4%]; the lesion was definitely missed in 49 [19%]; in fact the lesion was missed twice on consecutive chest radiographs in 16 patients and 6 patients it was missed 3 times or more.
       
    Location of the tumour did not influence the miss rate. However superimposing structures were significantly more common in the patients with missed lesions [71% vs 2%]. Additionally missed lesions were significantly smaller [median diameters 16 vs 40 mms]; most of the lesions 10 mms or less were missed in 71%.
        
    The median delay in the diagnosis of missed lesions was 472 days which was significantly longer than the 29 days for diagnosis of detected lesions. The extra delay resulted in the conversion of the tumours from stage T1 to T2 in 21 patients with missed lesions [43%]. Of the remaining 28 patients with missed lesions 22 continued to remain in stage T1 and 6 in stage T2.
      
    The authors conclude that miss rate of 19% [in other reported series from 20% to 50%] has a definite impact on prognosis and therefore remains a cause of concern.

        

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:41:33+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Lung Volume

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