Speciality
Spotlight

 




 


Respiratory – Pulmonary – Asthma


 

 





Surgery

      

  • C Wyser, P Stulz, M Soler, et al (Univ Hosp, Basel, Switzerland)


    Prospective Evaluation of an Algorithm for the Functional Assessment of Lung Resection Candidates.


    Am J Respir Crit Care Med 159: 1450-1456, 1999.

        


    The risk of postoperative complications is increased in patients with impaired pulmonary function and exercise testing and predicted postoperative function have been gaining importance in the assessment of candidates for lung resection surgery. The authors have worked out an algorithm for preoperative functional evaluation and they studied this algorithm prospectively.

        


    One hundred thirty-seven patients with clinically resectable lesions were studied. The algorithm incorporated cardiac history, including an electrocardiogram, and the 3 parameters of forced expiratory volume in 1 second, diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide, and maximal oxygen uptake, and their respective predicted postoperative values were calculated on the basis of radionuclide perfusion scans.

       


    These patients were subjected to surgeries, 85 being lobectomies, 38 pneumonectomies, and 9 segmental or wedge resection surgeries. Five patients were considered functionally inoperable. Extubation within 24 hours was possible for all patients. 

       


    This algorithm resulted in a low complication rate, including mortality and morbidity and it seems to be very practical approach to the patient who is being considered for lung resection. The split function which they have used refers to a lung perfusion study that measures the amount of isotope perfusion to each lung. It does not require any intubation or split lung pulmonary function testing so it is relatively easy and practical. With only 2 postoperative deaths of a result of cardiopulmonary failure and both of these individuals were marginal at best as they had a maximum oxygen uptake of only
    10mg/kg.ml.

         


 



 

 

Speciality Spotlight

 

 

Surgery
      

  • C Wyser, P Stulz, M Soler, et al (Univ Hosp, Basel, Switzerland)
    Prospective Evaluation of an Algorithm for the Functional Assessment of Lung Resection Candidates.
    Am J Respir Crit Care Med 159: 1450-1456, 1999.
        
    The risk of postoperative complications is increased in patients with impaired pulmonary function and exercise testing and predicted postoperative function have been gaining importance in the assessment of candidates for lung resection surgery. The authors have worked out an algorithm for preoperative functional evaluation and they studied this algorithm prospectively.
        
    One hundred thirty-seven patients with clinically resectable lesions were studied. The algorithm incorporated cardiac history, including an electrocardiogram, and the 3 parameters of forced expiratory volume in 1 second, diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide, and maximal oxygen uptake, and their respective predicted postoperative values were calculated on the basis of radionuclide perfusion scans.
       
    These patients were subjected to surgeries, 85 being lobectomies, 38 pneumonectomies, and 9 segmental or wedge resection surgeries. Five patients were considered functionally inoperable. Extubation within 24 hours was possible for all patients. 
       
    This algorithm resulted in a low complication rate, including mortality and morbidity and it seems to be very practical approach to the patient who is being considered for lung resection. The split function which they have used refers to a lung perfusion study that measures the amount of isotope perfusion to each lung. It does not require any intubation or split lung pulmonary function testing so it is relatively easy and practical. With only 2 postoperative deaths of a result of cardiopulmonary failure and both of these individuals were marginal at best as they had a maximum oxygen uptake of only 10mg/kg.ml.
         

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:41:47+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Surgery

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