Speciality
Spotlight

 




 


Gastroenterologist


     

 





Transplant

    

  • Ashok Jain, MD, Jorge Reyes, MD, Randeep Kashyap, MD, S. Forrest Donson, MD, Anthony J. demetris, MD, Kris Ruppert, PhD, Kareem Abu-Almagd, MD, Wallis Marsh, MD, Juan Madariaga, MD, George Mazariegos, MD, David Geller, MD, C. Andrew Bonham, MD Timothy Gayowski, MD, Thomas Cacciarelli, MD, Paulo Fontes, MD, Thomas E. Starzl, MD, PhD, and John J. Fung, MD, PhD [ From the Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute and the Departments of Surgery and Pathology, the School of pharmaceutical Sciences, and the Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania]

    Long -Term Survival After Liver Transplantation 4,000 Consecutive Patients at a Single Center

    Annals of Surgery, Volume 232, October 2000, No.4, Pg Nos. 490-500

      

    Although many reports, including registry data have delineated short-term factors that influence survival, few reports have examined factors that affect long-term survival after liver transplantation.

       

    4000 consecutive patients who underwent liver transplantation [February 1981 to April 1988] were analyzed and followed upto March 2000. The effect of donor and recipient age at the time of transplantation, recipient genders, diagnosis, and year of transplantation were compared. Rate of retransplantation, causes of re-transplantation and causes of death were examined.

       

    The overall survival was 59%. The actuarial 18 year survival was 48%. Survival was significantly better in children, in female recipients and in those operated after 1990. The rates of re-transplantation for acute and chronic rejection were significantly lower with tacrolimus-based immunosuppression. The risk of graft failure and death was relatively stable after the first year with recurrence of disease, malignancies and age-related complications being major factors for loss.

       

    They conclude that significantly improved patient and graft survival has been observed over time and graft rejection has emerged as a rarity.

           

 



 

 

Speciality Spotlight

 

 
Gastroenterologist
     

 

Transplant
    

  • Ashok Jain, MD, Jorge Reyes, MD, Randeep Kashyap, MD, S. Forrest Donson, MD, Anthony J. demetris, MD, Kris Ruppert, PhD, Kareem Abu-Almagd, MD, Wallis Marsh, MD, Juan Madariaga, MD, George Mazariegos, MD, David Geller, MD, C. Andrew Bonham, MD Timothy Gayowski, MD, Thomas Cacciarelli, MD, Paulo Fontes, MD, Thomas E. Starzl, MD, PhD, and John J. Fung, MD, PhD [ From the Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute and the Departments of Surgery and Pathology, the School of pharmaceutical Sciences, and the Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania]
    Long -Term Survival After Liver Transplantation 4,000 Consecutive Patients at a Single Center
    Annals of Surgery, Volume 232, October 2000, No.4, Pg Nos. 490-500
      
    Although many reports, including registry data have delineated short-term factors that influence survival, few reports have examined factors that affect long-term survival after liver transplantation.
       
    4000 consecutive patients who underwent liver transplantation [February 1981 to April 1988] were analyzed and followed upto March 2000. The effect of donor and recipient age at the time of transplantation, recipient genders, diagnosis, and year of transplantation were compared. Rate of retransplantation, causes of re-transplantation and causes of death were examined.
       
    The overall survival was 59%. The actuarial 18 year survival was 48%. Survival was significantly better in children, in female recipients and in those operated after 1990. The rates of re-transplantation for acute and chronic rejection were significantly lower with tacrolimus-based immunosuppression. The risk of graft failure and death was relatively stable after the first year with recurrence of disease, malignancies and age-related complications being major factors for loss.
       
    They conclude that significantly improved patient and graft survival has been observed over time and graft rejection has emerged as a rarity.
           

 

 

By |2022-07-20T16:41:48+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Transplant

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