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Speciality
Spotlight

 




 


Obstetric & Gynaecology


 

 




Cytomegalovirus
Infection & HIV 

   

  • Cytomegalovirus
    Infection and HIV-1 Disease Progression in Infants
    Born to HIV-1-infected Women.

    A
    Kovacs, for the Pediatric Pulmonary and
    Cardiovascular Complications of Vertically
    Transmitted HIV Infection Study Group (Univ of
    Southern California, Los Angeles).


    N Engl J Med 341: 77-84, 1999


       


    Background – Cytomegalovirus (CMV) appears to play a
    role in the progression of HIV-1 disease progression
    was studied in 365 uninfected patients and 75 HIV-1
    infected patients.

       


    Infants with and without HIV-1 infection have
    similar rates of CMV infection in utero. However,
    HIV-1 infected infants have greater rates of CMV
    infection acquired perinatally or in the first 4
    years of life. Co-infection with CMV is
    significantly associated with rapid HIV-1 disease
    progression and, in some children, early devastating
    CNS disease. Future studies should focus on
    strategies to prevent CMV infection in these
    high-risk babies.

        

      



 

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Speciality Spotlight

 

 

Cytomegalovirus Infection & HIV 
   

  • Cytomegalovirus Infection and HIV-1 Disease Progression in Infants Born to HIV-1-infected Women.
    A Kovacs, for the Pediatric Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Complications of Vertically Transmitted HIV Infection Study Group (Univ of Southern California, Los Angeles).
    N Engl J Med 341: 77-84, 1999
       
    Background – Cytomegalovirus (CMV) appears to play a role in the progression of HIV-1 disease progression was studied in 365 uninfected patients and 75 HIV-1 infected patients.
       
    Infants with and without HIV-1 infection have similar rates of CMV infection in utero. However, HIV-1 infected infants have greater rates of CMV infection acquired perinatally or in the first 4 years of life. Co-infection with CMV is significantly associated with rapid HIV-1 disease progression and, in some children, early devastating CNS disease. Future studies should focus on strategies to prevent CMV infection in these high-risk babies.