Speciality
Spotlight

 




 

Obstetric
& Gynaecology


 

 




Infection – Chlamydia 

   

  • Evaluation of Vaginal Introital Sampling as an Alternative Approach for the Detection of Genital Chlamydia trachomatis Infection in Women. 

    M Domeika, et al (Uppsala Univ, Sweden; vilnius Univ, Lithuania). Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 78:131-136, 1999.

       


    The use of vaginal self-collected specimens for testing by polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) was investigated in one hundred twenty three women with genital symptoms and 160 without genital symptoms and was compared with that of the cervical and first voided urine samples. 

       


    It was found that the vaginal sample was the most sensitive specimen for detecting C trachomatis, with a sensitivity of 87.5%, compared with 75% for cervical and 50% for urine samples in the symptomatic group. In asymptomatic group the sensitivities was 100% for cervical, 75% vaginal and 37.5% for urine samples. 

       


    Conclusion : Vaginal self-sampling in PCR method is a sensitive technique. This approach may be important in the Chlamdyia trachomatis screening of young at-risk women.

       


    The prevalence of genital infection with C trachomatis in population of symptom free sexually active young women is relatively high. In this study, it was 5%. Screening for C trachomatis in the female genital tract allows treatment to be performed and reduces the likelihood of development of salpingitis. To obtain samples from the endocervix, a speculum examination needs to be performed. This procedure is uncomfortable, costly, and time consuming. A vaginal sample obtained by the woman herself was well accepted in this study and yielded a higher degree of sensitivity than was obtained by PCR testing of a urine sample. Material collected by the self-obtained vaginal swab appears to be reliable for screening for genital C trachomatis infection.

       

      



 

 

Speciality Spotlight

 

 

Infection – Chlamydia 
   

  • Evaluation of Vaginal Introital Sampling as an Alternative Approach for the Detection of Genital Chlamydia trachomatis Infection in Women. 
    M Domeika, et al (Uppsala Univ, Sweden; vilnius Univ, Lithuania). Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 78:131-136, 1999.
       
    The use of vaginal self-collected specimens for testing by polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) was investigated in one hundred twenty three women with genital symptoms and 160 without genital symptoms and was compared with that of the cervical and first voided urine samples. 
       
    It was found that the vaginal sample was the most sensitive specimen for detecting C trachomatis, with a sensitivity of 87.5%, compared with 75% for cervical and 50% for urine samples in the symptomatic group. In asymptomatic group the sensitivities was 100% for cervical, 75% vaginal and 37.5% for urine samples. 
       
    Conclusion : Vaginal self-sampling in PCR method is a sensitive technique. This approach may be important in the Chlamdyia trachomatis screening of young at-risk women.
       
    The prevalence of genital infection with C trachomatis in population of symptom free sexually active young women is relatively high. In this study, it was 5%. Screening for C trachomatis in the female genital tract allows treatment to be performed and reduces the likelihood of development of salpingitis. To obtain samples from the endocervix, a speculum examination needs to be performed. This procedure is uncomfortable, costly, and time consuming. A vaginal sample obtained by the woman herself was well accepted in this study and yielded a higher degree of sensitivity than was obtained by PCR testing of a urine sample. Material collected by the self-obtained vaginal swab appears to be reliable for screening for genital C trachomatis infection.
       

      

 

By |2022-07-20T16:43:03+00:00July 20, 2022|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Infection – Chlamydia

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