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Speciality
Spotlight

 




 

Obstetric
& Gynaecology


 

 




Infections & Toxoplasmosis

   

  • Treatment of Toxoplasmosis During Pregnancy : A Multicenter Study of Impact on Fetal Transmission and Children’s Sequelae at
    Age 1 year.

    Foulon W, Villena I, Stray-Pedersen B, et al (Free Univ of Brussels, Belgium)

    Am J Obstet Gynecol 180 : 410 – 415, 1999

       


    These investigators found that forty four percent of the women gave birth to a congenitally infected newborn. The only significant predictor was gestational age at maternal infection. 19 children (13%) had sequelae, which were severe in 9 (6%). Antibiotic administration did predict the absence of sequelae, especially severe forms. The sooner antibiotic treatment was begun after infection, the less often sequelae occurred.

       


    Conclusion : Although prenatal antibiotic therapy after toxoplasmosis during pregnancy did not affect the fetomaternal transmission rate of infection, it did decrease the rate of sequelae among infected newborns. 

       


    Editorial comment : 89% transmission in the 19 cases where infection occurred past 31 weeks of gestational age. With prenatal antibiotics, the fetal transmission rate was less than 40%, while without therapy, 72% of infants age 1 year were infected. Prenatal therapy also reduced the incidence of global involvement i.e. chorioretinitis, cranial calcifications, hydrocephalus, etc. from 28% without therapy to 10% with drug therapy. Medication during infancy for infected newborns is also important.

        

      



 

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Speciality Spotlight

 

 

Infections & Toxoplasmosis
   

  • Treatment of Toxoplasmosis During Pregnancy : A Multicenter Study of Impact on Fetal Transmission and Children’s Sequelae at Age 1 year.
    Foulon W, Villena I, Stray-Pedersen B, et al (Free Univ of Brussels, Belgium)
    Am J Obstet Gynecol 180 : 410 – 415, 1999
       
    These investigators found that forty four percent of the women gave birth to a congenitally infected newborn. The only significant predictor was gestational age at maternal infection. 19 children (13%) had sequelae, which were severe in 9 (6%). Antibiotic administration did predict the absence of sequelae, especially severe forms. The sooner antibiotic treatment was begun after infection, the less often sequelae occurred.
       
    Conclusion : Although prenatal antibiotic therapy after toxoplasmosis during pregnancy did not affect the fetomaternal transmission rate of infection, it did decrease the rate of sequelae among infected newborns. 
       
    Editorial comment : 89% transmission in the 19 cases where infection occurred past 31 weeks of gestational age. With prenatal antibiotics, the fetal transmission rate was less than 40%, while without therapy, 72% of infants age 1 year were infected. Prenatal therapy also reduced the incidence of global involvement i.e. chorioretinitis, cranial calcifications, hydrocephalus, etc. from 28% without therapy to 10% with drug therapy. Medication during infancy for infected newborns is also important.